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OU'WESTER 

1931 



"Published 2>y the Students o£ 

SOUTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY 
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BUILDING 



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ADMINISTRATION 




KING VIVION, B.A., M.A., B.D., D.D., L.L.D. 

President 



jSou'toester 




Randolph Wood Tinsley 

Assistant to President 



Oscar Alvin Ullrich 
Dean of the Faculty 



Professor of Biology and Geology; B. 
S. University of Virginia. 1898; Grad- 
uate Student, University of Chicago; 
Present position since 1903. 



Professor of Education; B. A. Univer- 
sity of Texas. 1915; M. A. 1917; Ph. D 
1926; Student of Military School of 
Psychology. Camp Greenleaf, Georgia: 
Graduate Student, University of Chi- 
cago: Present position since 1926. 



j&cm'tocstcr 




Laura Kuykendall 
Dean of W omen 

Director of Expression; Diploma in Ex- 
pression, North Texas College, 1903; 
Diploma in Expression, Southwestern 
University, 1904; B. A. 1924, M. A. 
1926; Student in University of Chicago, 
Summers 1911, 1913 and 1919. Present 
position since 1914. 



Henry Edwin Meyer 
Dean of Music 

Professor of Voice. Piano, Organ and 
Theory: Teacher's Diploma in Piano, 
Ithaca Conservatory of Music, 1910; 
Artist's Diploma in Piano, 1914: Grad- 
uate of Courses for Supervisors of Puh- 
lic School Music, Cornell University, 
1912; Organ pupil of Edward F. John- 
ston and Parvin Titus; Voice pupil of 
Eric Dudley and David Bispham; Pi- 
ano pupil of Jennie Pauli, H. W. Nor- 
din. Herbert Hilliard and Otto Stahl. 
Theory and Composition under Nor- 
din, Hilliard, Stahl, Thomas Tapper, 
Froelich and Leighton. Present po- 
sition since 1926. 



jgou'toester 




Isaac Joel McCook 



Business Manager 



Margaret Mood McKennon 
Librarian 



Pearl Alma Neas 
Registrar 



Ernest H. Hereford 



Manager Mood Hall 



j^ou'tocstcr 




Florence Campbell Rev. Edmund Heinson Lois Clarke Mrs. Georgia V. Bridgers 

Rita C. McClain C. T. Schaedel Sue Simpson Dr. Van Tipton 

Mabel Ericson Albert May Mary Elizabeth Fox 

Mrs. Minnie Wedemeyer Tom Clarke 



;Sou'tocstcr 




Helen Brewer, B.A. 
Instructor in English 



C. M. Edens, B.A. 
Director of Athletics 
and Coach 



Mrs. Anita Storks Gaedcke 
Instructor in Violin 



Elizabeth Cotton, B.A. 

Instructor in P.T. and Spanish 



Mrs. Buth Ferguson, B.A., M.A. 
Assistant Professor of English 



J. C. Godbey, B.A., M.A. 
Professor of Chemistry 



E. R. Hardin, B.A., M.A. 

Instructor in Public 
Speaking and Dramatic Lit. 



Claud Howard, Ph. D. 

Professor of 

English and Philosophy 



H. L. Gray, B.A. 

Professor of liihle and Religion 



E. H. Hereford, B.A., B.S. in 
Education, M.A. 
Associate Professor of Education 



G. C. Hester, B.A., M.A. B. .1. Imdd, B.A. 

Associate Professor of History Assistant Professor of 

and Political Science Physicul Education 



F. C. A. Lehmberg, B.A. 
M. A., Professor 
of German and French 



G. B. Huff, B.A., M.A. 
Instructor in Physics 



Laura Kuykendall, B.A., M.A. 

Director of Expression 



jSou'tocster 




H. E. Meyer 

Professor of Voice, Piano 
Organ and Theory 



Lucy B. Morgan, B.A., M.A. Katherine F. Tarver 
Assistant Professor of Spanish B.A., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of English 



Elizabeth Mills, B.S. 

Instructor in Voice, Piano 
and Theory 



E. P. Onstot, B.A. 
Instructor in Education 
and Psychology 



B. W. TlNSLEY, B.A. 

Professor of Biology 
and Geology 



W. C. Vaden, B.A., M.A. 

Professor of Latin 
Greek and French 



A. B. Wapple, B.S., MA. 

Associate Professor 
of Mathematics 



Oscar A. Ullrich, Ph. D. 

Professor of Education 
and Philosophy 



L. J. Waggoner, B.A., B.D., M.A. 

Associate Professor of 

Religious Education and History 



M. L. Williams, B.A., M.A. 
Professor of Economics and 
Sociology 



P. P. Young, B.A., M.A. 

Associate Professor of History 



Van C. Tipton, B.A., M.D. 
Associate Professor of Biology 



W. P. Wisdom, B.A. 

Instructor in Chemistry 



j&oiTtoter 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 1930-1931 

September 12-15 Preadmission Examination. 

September 15 Assignment to rooms in dormitories 

September 16 Freshman conference in auditorium 

Registration of all sophomores, juniors, and seniors A through M 

September 17 Registration of all freshmen and seniors from N through Z 

September 18 Class work begins 

Formal opening exercises in auditorium 

September 20 Faculty reception at Woman's Building 

September 21 President's opening address to students at Methodist Church 

November 27 Thanksgiving 

December 2 Final examinations for fall quarter starts 

December 9 All students register for winter quarter 

December 10 Class work begins 

December 20 Christmas recess 

December 30 Class work resumed 

March 2 Final examinations for winter quarter 

March 5 Between terms vacation 

March 10 Registration for spring quarter 

March 11 Class work begins 

April 25 Last day for seniors to apply for degrees 

May 12 Address before Scholarship Society 

May 23-26 Final examinations for seniors 

May 26-30 Final examinations for spring quarter 

May 30-June 2 Fifty-eighth commencement exercises 



jSou tester 




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AT LAST 




Edwin Aiken, B.A. 

Sweetwater 
Major — Chemistry 
Football '26, '28, '29, '30 



Grace Baker, B.A. 

Cushing 
Major — English 

Transfer from Lon Morris College 
Phi Theta Kappa 

Winner Junior College Scholarship 
Scholarship Society, '30, '31 
Student Asst. English, '29, '30 
Life Service Band, '29, '31 
Student Volunteer 



Rev. Carl Berftquist, B.A. 

Georgetown 
Major — Hible 
Scholarship Society 
University Honor Council, '30, 
President 



Edgar Juston Allamon, B.A. 

Belton 
Major — English 
Asst. Ed. Megaphone '29, '30 
Asst. Ed. Magazine, '30 
Class Ed. Megaphone. '28, '29, '30, 

'31 
Business Manager Megaphone, '31 
Sigma Tau Delta 
Band, '28, '29, '30, '31 
Orchestra, '28, '29 



Ed. R. Barcus, Jr., B.A. 

Rosenberg 
Major — Bible 
K. A. 

President, Senior Class Fall Term, 
'31 



Marie Elizabeth Berger, B.A. 

Houston 
Major — History 
Phi Mu 

President Phi Mu 
Music Club 
Woman's Pan Hellenic 
Woman's Bldg. Honor Council 



Nancy Enid Avriett, B.A. 

Lamesa 
Major — E n glis h 
Phi Mu 

San Jacinto, '28, '29 
Music Club '29, '30 
Woman's Bldg. Honor Council '30, 

'31 
Woman's Pan Hellenic, President, 

'31 
Y.W.C.A. Cabinet, '30, '31 
Sigma Tau Delta 
Scholarship Society 
University Choir 
President, Phi Mu Sorority, '31 
Student Asst. Education 

William Bernard Barrett, B.A. 

Temple 
Major — Eco n o m ics 
Kappa Sigma 
President, '31; 
Men's Pan Hellenic, '29. '31, 
President '31 

James Ernest Bell, B.A. 

Joplin, Mo. 
Phi Delta Theta 

Asst. Bus. Manager, Magazine, '28 
Asst. Bus. Manager, Sou'wester, 

'27, '28, '29 
Bus. Manager, Sou'wester, '30 
Editor in Chief, Sou'wester, '31 
Glee Club, '27, '28 
Bus. Manager, Glee Club, '28 
Epworth League Cabinet, '28 



jSoiTtoester 




Helen Mancill Brewer, M.A. 

Ballinger 
Major — English 
Delta Delta Delta 



Leroy Howard Buss, B.A. 

Donna 
Major — Political Science 
Phi Delta Theta 
President, '31 

Pirate Band, '28, '29, '30, '31 
Orchestra '29 
German Club 
University Chorus, '28 



J. Frank Clark, Jr., M.A. 

Gatesville 
M ajor — Chemistry 
Megaphone Staff, '28, '30 
Editor In Chief, '30 
Science Society, '28-'31, 

President, '30 
Y.M.C.A. Cabinet, '27-'30 
University Honor Council, '29 
Mood Hall Honor Council, '29 
Southwestern Magazine Staff, 
Sou'wester, Staff, '29 
German Club, '31 



Roger A. Burleson, B.A. 

Round Rock 
Major — History 



Dorothy Ann Cavitt, B.A. 

Holland 

Major — History 

Alpha Delta Pi' 

President, '31 

Woman's Pan Hellenic, '30, '31 

Woman's Building Honor Council, 
'30, '31 

Y.W.C.A. Cabinet, '31 

Student Assistant in Physical Ed- 
ucation, '31 

Spanish Club, '30 



Mary Beulah Cook, B.A. 

Terrell 
M aj o r — E ngl is h 
Delta Delta Delta 
Pep Squad, '31 



Lois Butler, B. Mus. 

Major — Music 
Georgetown 



Mary Catherine Cely, B.A. 

Frankston 
Major — English 



Edwina Chreitzberg, B.A. 

Georgetown 
Major — Philosophy 
Phi Mu 
Pep Squad 



'29 



;Sou'toester 




Enoch H. Cook, B.A. 

Taft 
Major — Client istry 



Mary Clovis Cox, B.A., 

Sweetwater 
Major — Dra m atic Liter atu re 
Diploma in Expression 
Alpha Delta Pi, 
Mask and Wig 
Riders' Club 



R. C. Dansby, B.A. 

Bryan 
Major — Political Science 
Pi Kappa Delta 
President, '31 
Mask and Wig 
Intercollegiate Debater 
President Sophomore Class, 'winter 

term, '29 
Football, '30, '31 



James Elgin Cook, B.A. 

Thornton 
Major — Eco n o m ics 
Pi Kappa Alpha 



Paul Cuhvell, B.A. 

Salado 
Major — Economics and Sociology 
Transfer from Weatherford Junior 

College 
Phi Theta Kappa at Weatherford 
Kappa Alpha 



George R. Davis, B.A. 

Georgetown 
Major — Economics 



Elizabeth Cotton, M.A. 

Corinth, Miss. 
Major — Philosophy 



Laura Kathleen Curry, B.A. 

San Antonio 
Major — Spanish 
Transfer from Westmoorland^Col- 

lege 
Delta Delta Delta 
Pep Squad, '31 
University Honor Council 
Woman's Building Honor Council 
Y.W.C.A. Cabinet 
Mask and Wig 
Spanish Club 
University Choir 
Riders' Club 



Elizabeth Dayvault, B.A. 

Glen Flora 
Major — History 
Zeta Tau Alpha 



jgou'toestcr 




Anne Marie Doering, B.A. 

Dayton 
Major — Fre n ch 
Delta Delta Delta 
Treasurer, '31 
Executive Committee, Sec'y. 

Treas. '31 
Secretary and Treasurer, Students' 

Association, '31 
Y.W.C.A., Treasurer 
Mask and Wig 
Scholarship Society 
University Choir 

Shelton Durrenber£er, B.A. 

Copperas Cove 
Major — Econ o mics 
President, Students' Association, '31 
Student Assistant in Physics, 

'28-'31 
Glee Club, *28-'29 
Member of Texas Academy 

of Science 
Vice President, Mood Hall Honor 

Council, '31 
Waiters' Union,_ '28-31 
Scholarship Society 
University Honor Council 
Y.M.C.A. Cabinet 
Mask and Wig 
Science Society 

Camilla Lydia Emerson, M.A. 

Georgetown 

Major — History 
San Jacinto 
Mask and Wig 



Louise Dicken, B.A. 

Duncan, Okla. 

Major — Violin 

Buccaneers 

Woman's Building Honor Council 

Y.W.C.A. Cabinet 

Music Club 

Little Symphony Orchestra 

Secretar>, Senior Class, '31 

Co-ed Band 

Pep Squad, '31 

Percival Rice Eddins, B.A. 

Marlin 
Major — Economics and Sociology 
University Choir, *29-'31 
Glee Club, '27-'29 

Joe Emanuel, B.A. 

Jacksboro 
Major — Bible and Religion 
Ministerial Association 
Secretary '31 



Doris Dickerson, B.A. 

Garden City 
Major — English 
Student Assistant in English 
San Jacinto Literary Society, '28, '29 
Vice President, '29 
University Choir, '30, '31 
Y.W.C.A. Cabinet, '30/31 
Woman's Building Honor Council, 

'29, '30, '31 
President, Sigma Tau Delta, '31 
Vice President, Scholarship 

Society, '31 
Music Club, President, '31 
Magazine Staff, '30 

Florence Roberta Elliott,B.A. 

Thorndale 
Major — English 
Alpha Delta Pi 
Woman's Building Honor Council, 

'31 
Y.W.C.A. Cabinet, '31 
Secretary, Freshman Class, '28 
Secretary, Senior Class, '31 

Mary Elizabeth Fox, M.A. 

Granger 
Major — History 
Delta Delta Delta 
Assistant to Dean of Women, '31 



j&ou'toester 




Harriett Mildred Flinn, B.A. 

Cameron 
Major — English 

Delta Delta Delta, President, *31 
Woman's Pan Hellenic 
Magazine Staff 

Woman's Building Honor Council 
Scholarship Society 
Rider's Club 
Sigma Tau Delta 

Ethel Anna Girvin, B.A. 

Georgetown 
Major — English 
Student Assistant in German 
Library Assistant. '2S-'31 
San Jacinto, '28-29 

Harry L. Henslee, B.A. 

Caldwell 
Major — Eco nom ics 
Kappa Alpha 



Fontaine Frskine, B.A. 

Temple 
Major — Ckem istry 
Kappa Sigma 
Southwestern Magazine, 

Editor-in-Chief, '31 
Science Society 

Mrs. Otilia Hernandez Giron, 
B.A. 

Georgetown 
Major — Spanish 
Spanish Club 

Ruth Aleen Hardin, B.A. 

Georgetown 
Major — Dramatic Literature 
Zeta Tau Alpha 
Mask and Wig 
Pep Squad 

National Collegiate Players 
Riders' Club 



Kermit Field Gibbons, B.A. 

Hallettsville 
Major — Bible and Religion 
Student Assistant in History 
Southwestern Magazine, 

Business Manager, '31 
Megaphone Staff, '30 
Epworth League Cabinet, '30 
Y.M.C.A. Cabinet, '30, '31 
German Club 
Ministerial Association 
President, Freshman Class, 

Spring term, '28 
Vice President, Senior Class, 

Fall term, '31 
San Jacinto 
Vivian Kathlyn Hamilton, B.A. 

Georgetown 
Major — Dramatic Literature 
Delta Delta Delta 
Mask and Wig 
National Collegiate Players 
Pep Squad, '29 
Alamo Literary Society, '26 

Lola Allyn Haden, B.A. 

Galveston 
Major — English 
Delta Delta Delta 
Megaphone Staff 

Magazine Staff, Assistant Editor 
Executive Committee, '31 



jSou'tocstcr 




Nan Holland, B.A. 

Decatur, Alabama 
Major — Dramatic Literature 
Alpha Delta Pi, Corresponding 

Secretary 
Secretary, Junior Class, Spring 

term, '30 
Transfer from Westmoorland 

College 
Vice President, Honor Council. 
Member of Dramatic Club 
Transfer from Breneau College 
Member of Dramatic Club 



Nila Ruth Kennedy, B.A. 

Grapeland 
Major — Economics 
Epworth League Cabinet 



Ossie May Lanier, B.A. 



Leora Horger, B.A. 

Hondo 
Major — History 
Epworth League Cabinet, '29 
University Choir '29-'31 
Music Club, '28*31 
Choral Club, '28-'29 



'27 Homer Earl King, B.A. 

Hondo 
Major — Political Science and 

History 
Kappa Alpha 



Kiyoun Lee, M.A. 

Song Dong, Korea 
Major — Bible and Religion 
Ministerial Association 
Transfer from S.M.U. and 
Weatherford Junior College 



Clovis Huddleston, B.S. 

Eliasville 
Major — Chemistry 
Transfer from Weatherford 
Junior College 



Buster L. Langford, B.A. 

Georgetown 
M ajor—Dra m atic L iter at u re 
Student Assistant in Geology, 
Pi Kappa Alpha 
Mask and Wig 
National Collegiate Players, 

President, '31 
President, Senior Class, 

Winter term, '31 



Ethyl E. Lehmberg, B.A. 

Mason 
Major — English 
Transfer from College of 

Industrial Arts 
President, Woman's Building 

Honor Council, '31 
Treasurer, Spanish Club, '30 
University Honor Council, '31 



■:u 



^ou'tocstcr 




Margaret Lewis, B.A. 

Manvel 
Major — Mathem aiics 
Science Society- 
Life Service Band 
University Choir 
Transfer from Blinn Memorial 
College 

Ruth Martin, B.A. 

Bryan 
Major — English 
Alpha Delta Pi, Recording 

Secretary 
Transfer from South Park Junior 

College, Beaumont 
Transfer from Texas A. & M. 



Cecil R. Middleton, B.A. 

Spicewood 
Major — Chemistry 



LaNelle Love, B.A. 

Chriesman 
Major — Spanish 

Epvvorth League Cabinet, *27-'30 
University Chora! Club, '28 
Woman's Building Honor Council, 

'28, President, '30 
Scholarship Society, '29, '30, 

President, '31 
Y.W.C.A. Cabinet, '28, "30, 

President, '31 
University Honor Council, '30 
Sigma Tau Delta 

William Kenneth Matthews, 
B.A. 

La Feria 

Major — Bible and Religion 
University Honor Council, '31 
Epworth League Cabinet, '29 
President, Life Service Band, '29 
President, Ministerial Association, 
'31 



Edward McAlexander, B.A. 

Temple 
Major — Mathematics 
University Choir, '31 

Johnnie J. E. Mercer, B.A. 

Georgetown 
Major — Economics 
S. Association 
Football, '27, '28, '29, '31 



Elizabeth Mills 


B. 


Mus. 


Marie Moses, B.A. 


Grant City, 


Mo. 




Georgetown 


Major — Voice 






Major — Dramatic Literature 


Sigma Tau Delta 






Zeta Tau Alpha, 


Writers' Club 






President, '31 


University Choir 






Woman's Pan Hellenic 
Pep Squad, '31 
Mask and Wig 
Vice President, Freshman 
Class, '28 



Arthur William Philip 
Munk, B.A. 

Fentress 
Major — Bible and Religion 
President, Y.M.C.A. '31 
Pi Kappa Delta 
Ministerial Association 
Scholarship Society 
Intercollegiate Debaters 
Life Service Band 



jSou'tticster 




Briten E. Norwood, B.A. 

Doucette 
Major — Ch e m is try 
Executive Committee, '31 
Science Society 
Member of Texas Academy of 

Science 
Member of American Chemical 

Society 
Transfer from Lon Morris College 
Editor, of Lon Morris Annual, '29 
President, Phi Theta Kappa at Lon 

Morris 
Thomas Miles Price, B.A. 

Goose Creek 
Major — Bible and Religion 
Scholarship Society 
Pi Kappa Delta 
Ministerial Association 
President, Life Service Band 
Intercollegiate Debater 
Transfer from Lon Morris College, 
Jacksonville and Houston Junior 
College 
Herschell Richeson, B.A. 

Frost 
Major — Economics and 

Sociology 
Pirate Band 
Sou'wester Staff, '31 
Transfer from Weatherford 
College 



Alleen Pickett, B.A. 

Houston 
Major — Econ o m ics 
Delta Delta Delta 
Riders' Club 



Madge Cooper Quebedeaux,B.A. 

Georgetown 



Major — Sociology 
Alpha Delta Pi 



Charles William 


Anna E. Schoff, 


B. Mus. 


Schweers, B.A. 


San Antonio 




Hondo 


Major — Voice 




Major — Bible 


Delta Delta Delta 




Epworth League Cabinet 


Pep Squad 




Ministerial Association 


Megaphone Staff, 


'31 


German Club 


y.w.c.A. 






University Choir, 


'31 




Music Club, Vice 


President 




'31 





Seawillow Pipkin, B.A. 

Beau mont 
Major — English 
Alpha Delta Pi 
Transfer from South Park 
Junior College, Beaumont 

Mrs. Mabel Taylor Quebedeaux, 
M.A. 

Georgetown 
Major — History 
Alpha Delta Pi 
Library Assistant 
Vice President, Freshman Class, 

'04, '05 
Graduate in Pianoforte, '07 
Council of Honor, '07, '08, 

Secretary 
Pan Hellenic Council, '09 
Orchestra, '08-'ll 

Associate Editor of Daily Senior 
Senior Editor, Sou'wester, '09 



Vance Seamans, B.A. 

Weslaco 
Major — History 
Pi Kappa Alpha 
Football, '28-'31 
S. Association, '28-'31 
Basketball, '28-'31 
Captain Basketball, '31 
Acting Captain Football 
'31 



jSou'toter 




Willard E. Shipp, B.A. 

jarrell 
Major — Bible and Religion 
Ministerial Association 

Dora Deane Smith, B.A. 

Lorn eta 
Major — Pia n o 
Music Club 
Instructor in Piano 
Scholarship Society 



Tom C. Sharp, Jr., B.A. 

Humble 
Mawr — Chemistry 
Phi" Delta Theta, Pres. '30 
Men's Pan Hellenic, '31 
Sou'wester, Business Manager, '31 
Southwestern Magazine, 
Business Manager, '30 
German Club 
Mood Hall Honor Council, '29 



Ethel Inez Stinson, B.A. 

San Antonio 
Maior — Bible and Religion 
Y.W.C.A. 

Epworth League Cabinet 
Scholarship Society 
Woman's Building Honor Counci 
University Honor Council, '30 
Scholarship Society: Secretary 

and Treasurer, '31 
Student Volunteer President 
Girls' Tennis Singles, Champion 



Alton Leslie Smith, B.A. 

L u f k i n 
Major — Chem is try 
Phi Delta Theta 
Executive Committee, '31 
Y.M.C.A. Cabinet 
Football Letter, '28, '29, '30, '31 
Basketball Squad, '2S-'31 
Track letter, '28, '29, '30, '31 
Captain Track, '31 
Vice President, Sophomore Class, 

fall term, '29 
President, Sophomore Class, winter 

term, '29 
President, Junior Class, 

winter term, '30 
Student Representative on Athletic 

Council, '30 
Frances Stone, B.A. 

Georgetown 
Major — English 
7,eta Tau Alpha 
Woman's Pan Hellenic 
Sigma Tau Delta 



Roy B. Temple, B.A. 

Weatherford 
Major — History and 

Political Science 
President University 

Honor Council, '31 
University Choir 
President, Senior Class 

Spring term, *31 
Transfer from Weatherford 

Junior College 
Football, '27, '29 



Mildred Thies, B.A. Lillian BLinche 

Georgetown Thompson, B.A. 

Major — Economics Amarillo 

Major — History 

Ze<"a Tau Alpha, President 

'30 
President, Woman's Pan 

Hellenic, '30 
Y.W.C.A. 
Woman's Building Honor 

Council 



Frances Faye Walker, 
B.A. 

Hutto 

Major- — English 



j&ou'tocstcr 




Mary Maude Wedemeyer, B.A. 

Georgetown 
Major — English 
Epworth League Cabinet 
Scholarship Society 
Sigma Tau Delta 

Mary Wilcox, M.A. 

Georgetown 
Major — Chemistry 
Zeta Tau Alpha 



Leta Alice Wood, B.A. 

Corpus Christi 
Major — Bible and Religion 
Pep Squad, '31 President 
Woman's Building Honor Council 
Y.W.C.A. 

Epworth League Cabinet 
Mask and Wig 
Scholarship Society 
University Choir 
Secretary of Junior Class, '30 
Transfer from Westmoorland 
College 



Clyde Whittle, B.A. 

Lawn 

Major — 

Mood Hall Honor Council 

Vice President, Students' Assoc- 
iation 

Vice President, Y.M.C.A. 

S. Association 

Basketball, '28-'31 

Captain, Basketball, '30 

All Texas Conference Center, '30 

Most valuable man in Texas Con- 
ference basketball, '30 



John Hester Williams, B.A. 

Georgetown 
Major — Mathematics 
S. Association 
Football, '28, '29, '30, '31 
Basketball, '28, '29, '30, '31 
Track, *28, '29, '30, *31 
Captain, Football, '31 



Ruth Yearwood, B.A. 

Georgetown 
Major — History 



Samuel Easley Wilcox, Jr. B.A. 

Georgetown 
Major — Mathematics 
S. Association 
Pirate Band 
Science Society 
Tennis, '28, '29, '31 
Assistant Business Manager, 
Megaphone '28 



William Pierce Widsom, B.A. 

Hamilton 
Major — Chemistry 
Science Society 
Member of American Chemical 

Society 
Member of Texas Academy of 

Science 



San Wan Yun, B.A. 

Echun, Korea 
Ma jo r — Ch e m ist ry 
Y.M.C.A. 

Science Society 
Ministerial Association 
German Club 



j&ou'fcutster 



SENIOR PICNIC 





•»•««..»« 



CO 



NEXT 




Jewel Alexander 
Houston 



Chester Allen 
Georgetown 



Lawrence Allison 
Uvalde 



Eli Aronson 
Elgin 



Dinks Baskin 

Cameron 



Mary Belle Batte Geo. W. Bennett 
Cameron Midlothian 



Ben Boiimfalk 

San Antonio 



J. Wesley Boothe 
Da isetla 



Joseph Bowles, Jr. Mary K. Browning Ransom Buchholz 

Sulphur Springs, Ark. Coleman Georgetown 



Margaret Caldwell Eddie Mae Clark 

Odem Phoenix, Ark. 



Clifton Coston 
Ireland 



Burton Coleman 
I littsboro 



W. W. CONNERLY 

Florien, La. 



H. W. Cortes 
Houston 



Jennie Davis 

Georgetown 



Frank Driskill 
Crockett 



j&ou'tocstcr 




Tom Eriscon 
Georgetown 



Victor Foerster 

Manor 



Carter B. Fuller 
Lufkin 



Lillian Gorzycki 
College Station 



Wailes Gray 
Georgetown 



Ralph Hamme 
Edinburg 



Louise Hardin 
Galesrilte 



Lucille Hodges 

Georgetown 



Nellie J. Harris 
Georgetown 



Edna Holland 
Decatur, Ala. 



Marion Holmes 
Temple 



Lucinda Mae Isaacs 
Georgetown 



Eunice James 
Austin 



Lloyd Johns 
Georgetown 



Dewey Johnson 
Weatherford 



Lucy B. Jones 
Malhis 



Marjorie Karbacii 
Temple 



Lester Keyser 
Castell 



Marie Kilgore 
Beaumont 



Robert Lee 

Thorndale 



jSoiTtoestxr 




Hal McCombs 


Leslie McDaniel 


Harley McD/vniel 


Lilbuhn May 


San Juan 


Burnet 


Olio 


Georgetown 


Mohan McDaniel 


Wm. P. Murray 


Blossom Nall 


Cecil Pennington 


Georgetown 


La Feria 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 


Georgeloivn 


Vonnie Mae Perry 


Evelyn Raetzsch 


Helen Purl 


Maxine Bay' 


Dallas 


Marfa 


Georgetown 


Jacksonville 


Donald Van Dresar 


Madison Thomas 


Ruth Tipton 


Lois Thornton 


Pharr 


Woodsboro 


Jacksonville 


Dallas 


Glenn Terry 


Reagan Taylor 


Billy Stump 


Morris Studer 


Richland Springs 


Pine Hill 


Georgetown 


Ireland 



jgou'tocstcr 




Fred Sterling 
Galveston 



Mary E. Sparger 
Doucette 



George Smith 
Temple 



Foy Sellars 
Houston 



P. G. Secrest 
Bay City 



Esther Saathoff 
Hondo 



Charles Rumble 
Edinburg 



Roy A. Richardson 
Rockwood 



Verena Reed 
Memphis 



Reba Young 

Cameron 



Walter Wood 
Corpus Chrisli 



Julia Mary Wallace 
Beaumont 



Fern Whitten 



Mary Wilder 

Beaumont 



Hallie Wilcox 

Georgetown 



Clarence Wiggam 
Harlingen 



Ruby Cooper 

Georgetown 



Folk Weaver 
Santa Rosa 



Duncan Whiteside 

Georgetown 



Frances Wherry 
Tennessee Colony 



Henry Fox 

Granger 



j&ou'ttiester 




3> ■»■■,»» 



AN* FURTHERMORE 




Ruby Mae Baten 
Beaumont 



Lobna Anderson 
Beaumont 



J. Link Baker 
Kemp 



Murff Bledsoe 
Port Arthur 



M. U. Borden 
Sun Antonio 



Warren A. Brown 
Houston 



Catiiryn Carter 
Temple 



M. E. Brooks 
Bellville 



Florence Campbell 
Tyler 



Florence Chambers 
Beaumont 



Jack Cook 

Thorn Ion 



Kenneth Crawford 
Jarrell 



Macelle Cook 

Thornton 



J. W. Crawford 
Mc Allen 



Philmore Czarowitz 

Barllell 



Mabgabet Davis 
Nederland 



Bubgin Dunn 
Lockhart 



Warren Davis 

Donno 



David Daniel 

Alice 



jgou'tocstcr 




Elizabeth Edwards 
Georgetown 



Whitlow Elzner 
Bastrop 



Jess Emert 
Weatherford 



Gladys Engbrock 
El Campo 



Ford Ferguson 
Leesville, La. 



Margaret Ferguson 
Leesville, La. 



J. P. Franklyn 

Rockdale 



Gladys Ferguson 
Leesville, La. 



Charles Frederick 
Pineland 



Louis Giron 
Georgetown 



Janie Marie Hill 

Beaumont 



Elizabeth Gould 
Taylor 



Tomasine Howell 
Orange 



Grace Foster 
Georgetown 



A. C. Hart 

Weslaco 



Willie Lee Heath 
Madisonville 



Juanita Johnson 
Bartletl 



Oltorf Holloway 
Martin 



Ruth Hughes 

Atlanta 



j&ou'toester 




Frances Johnson 
Thorndale 



Martin Johnson 
Hutto 



Miller Jordan 
Weslaco 



Nelline Keese 
Lyons 



Elizabeth King 

Allan hi 



Roy Rurtii 
Lufkin 



Franklin Martinson 

San la Rosa 



Joe McAuliffe, Jr. 
Corpus Christi 



Dohan Oatman 

Llano 



Ruth Leggett 
Livingston 



James L. McClure 
Donna 



Vern Pendlkton 
Ireland 



Claude Lunsford 
Georgetown 



Lucille Love 
Andice 



Emma Alice Nicholson 
Houston 



Lillian Mondrick 
Cameron 



Glendene Potts 
Bertram 



Louie Oltorf 
Marlin 



Holland Porter 

Caldwell 



jSou'tocster 




Nelda Prather 
Beaumont 



Robert Purl 
Georgetown 



Hazel Quick 
Round Rock 



Clarice Raetzsch 
Marfa 



Wallace Pittman 
Dublin 



La Mar Powell 
Blewett 



Chiquita Sanders 
Sinton 



Lowell O. Ryan 

Victoria 



Glynn Story 
Comanche 



Cathrine Ray 
Lyford 



Gertrude Rowe 
Sour Lake 



Harry Sisson 
Palacios 



Ruth Rives 

West a co 



Donald Reisinger 

Georgetown 



William Strauss 
Houston 



Sibyl Swinnea 
Reagan 



Rernice Sherman 
Georgetown 



W. M. Smith 
Hondo 



Bob Simpson 
Corpus Christi 



jSou'tocster 




Beatty Oldham 


Joe Tipton 


Frank Turner 


Arthur Wackeb 


Palestine 


Bartlett 


Martin 


Bartlett 


Francis Warden 


C. J. Watson 


Sue Webb 


Eugene Weimers 


Bertram 


Florence 


Dallas 


Georgetown 


Howard Weir 


Dave Williams 


Ellis Wood 


Walter Wood 


Georgetown 


Martin 


Avondale, Pa. 


Corpus Christi 


Robert Purl 


E. E. Wyatt 


Ruth Zimmerman 


Allise Wylie 


Georgetown 


San Antonio 


Martin 


Henderson 



jSotTtocstcr 







**.. 



f«» 



CREAM O* TH* CROP 




Harry D. Allen 

Taylor 



Alva Hall Baker 

Houston 



Willie Ruth Asher 
Arid ice 

ROW EN A MOORENE BENNETT E. DeA BOARD 

Goliad Weslaco 

Margaret Allison Black 
Llano 
Marlin L. Brockette 
Copperas Cove 

Dorothy Bryan 
Decatur 
O. L. Clark 
Pltoenix, Ariz. 

Gerald Clopton 
Elgin 
Will Ford Crunk 
Georgetown 

Necia Mae Cox 
Bellon 



Elmo Canion 
Holland 



William Cockrell 
PleasanUm 



Mary Ann Davis 
Fort Worth 



Jack Allen Bone 
Gatescille 

Anna Louise Bauman 
Llano 

Bobert P. Brent 
Dallas 
Dorothy Lee Bridges 
Taylor 

Mary Buth Casbeer 
Liberty Hill 
James Carter 
Corpus Christi 

Ann Catherine Cooper 
Sherman 
Lula Grace Conner 
East Bernard 

Gill Hudson De Witt 
Houston 
Cherrille De Bardeleben 
Brownsville 



jSou'tocstcr 




Herbert E. Dickey 
Husk 



Paul Dornbluth 

Cuern 



C. Monroe Fairciiild 
Burke 



R. L. Flowers, Jr. 
Georgetown 



Murchison Foster 
Derine 



Bryan Fox 

Granger 



C. H. Gee 
Georgetown 



Mildred Gillum 
Georgetown 
Lira Nell Green 
Palestine 

Curtis C. Gunn 
Houston 



Will M. Dunn 

Loekluirt 



O. Leon Forsvall 

Georgetown 



Vela Mae Frenzel 
Thorndale 



Bekniece Girvin 
Georgetown 



E. Addilese Haag 

Midland 



Mabel Ericson 
Georgetown 

Josephine Elliott 
Kress 

Edith Foster 

Georgetown 

Clarence L. Foster 

Georgetown 

John E. Galey - 
Kemp 
Moody Galbreath 
Liberty Hill 

Milton Gray 
Nacogdoches 
Herbert L. Gray 
Georgetown 

Audry E. Harrell 
Holland 
Fannie Alice Hardt 
Paint Rock 



^otTtoester 




Pauline Harris 
Elgin 

R. Marie Harris 

Elgin 

Samuel K. Hood 
Palacios 

Ludell Howard 
Pearsall 

J. Vaudine Johnson 
Atlanta 

Ernestine Jones 
Colorado 
Erna Karbach 
Kenedy 

Charles Kellog 
Mc Allen 
Leola Lam 
Oglesby 

Dorothy Lane 
Lane Cily 



Cora Lee Hatch 
Lorena 



Ralph Huitt 

Beaumont 



Ruby Lee Jones 
Malhis 



W. Homer King 

Georgetown 



Ella V. Lanier 
Jasper 



Bobbie Hill 

Georgetown 

Frances Hicks 
Henderson 

Gladys Johnson 
Luling 

Lois Johns 

Georgetown 

Erwiiv Jordan 
Mason 
Ruth Jones 
Bartlett 

Harold Kuykendall 
Emhouse 
Helen Korges 
Elgin 

Elva Rhea Lawhon 
Taylor 
Charles Lawrence 
Thornton 



^ou'ttiester 




Phillip Lea 

Georgeloivn 



Fred McKenzie 
Uvalde 



Dorothy Maddox 

Thorndale 



Geneva Helen Leggitt 
Hullo 



Lillie Mae Logan 

Georgetown 

Mary Christine McKinney 
Bellville 



Alhert Boynton Martin 
Wesluco 



Ruby Melburn 

Georgetoivn 

Wilbur Leroy Meier 
Elgin 

Elizabeth Newberry 
Chihuahua, Mex. 
Myrtle H. Munson 
Georgetown 



Douglas Manning 

Johnnie Miller Ernest Morgan 

Navasola Columbus 

Lloyd Maurice Monroe 
Iowa Park 

Lonnie Nusom Gordon Otis Noble Mary Elizabeth Palm 

Corpus Christi Round Rock Georgetown 

Mary Emma Neyland Eleanor Louise Ostrom 

Jasper Corpus Christi 

Cooper Tate Parker Patty Lee Perkins Bessie M. Pivoto 

Raymondville Alice Beaumont 

Wellington Parker Frances Perrin 

Goose Creek Georgetown 



jSou'toester 




WlLLIARD S. PeTERMANN 

Beaumont 

Henry Price 
Georgetown 

Lurlene V. Ramsey 
Round Rock 

Evelyn B. Ransom 

Richmond 

Frances S. Samuell 
Houston 

Henry N. Sandall 
Nuvasota 
Robert L. Shaddock 
Beaumont 

Alma Marie Shannon 
Richmond 
Gladys Simpson 
Corpus Christi 

Annie Dee Smith 
\llunlii 



W. Louis Price 
Georgetown 



Sue Mae Reagan 
Beeville 



GOLDIE PURCELL 

Georgetown 



Mayme L. Prove 
Lockhart 



W. Lynn Ross 

Houston 



Noel A. Reed 
Paint Rock 
William H. Sanders Oscar Selander 

Sinion Houston 

La Verne Secrest 
Bay City 
Josephine Shannon Phil H. Shrader 

Wharton Raymondville 

W. J. Shore 
Coleman 
Doris C. Smith Margaret Sneed 

Pearsall Calvert 

George W. Smith 
Huntsville 



jgou'tocstcr 




Carl J. Sohns 
Thorndale 

Loraine Still 
Houston 

Virginia Stewart 
Vernone 

G. G. SwiCKHEIMER 

Fannin 
Jack R. Todd 
Kosse 

Byron E. Votaw 
Jarrell 
Carrie L. Weatherby 
Rosebud 

H. Smoot Whigham 
Georgetown 
Melba Williams 
Leander 

Icie Mae Wheeler 
Marble Falls 



Louise Stocklas 
Rosebud 



Conn Thomas 
Shiro 



George E. Walton 
Lampasas 



Eunice Wiemers 
Georgetown 



Edna Womack 
Corpus Christi 



Robert Sutton 
Rartlett 

Bill Stokes 
Jarrell 

Zella Lee Thorp 
Sonora 

Marion B. Thomas 
Anderson 

Lolita Washburn 
Houston 
Mary Blanche Ware 
Dallas 

D. C. Wiley 
Georgetown 
Davine Wilcox 
Georgetown 

Wynette Woodward 
Jarrell 
Helen 0. Woodson 
Conroe 



jSou'tocster 





IN 

MEMORIAM 

WILLIAM 

ROLSTON 

WALKER 



1 


■ 


■ 

> 
■ 

B 


1 M 




. i 


mF 


m 





MARY K.BROWNING 





MARY B. COOK 





CLARICE RAETZSCH 



m 



FRANCIS STONE 




r: ; 



I 





MISS 
SOUTHWESTERN 



CAMPUS 



» » » » » » 





SPRING BUDS » 



EVERY ONE HAPPY 





PICNICS 



NAME IT YOURSELF 





OUT O' DOORS 



HELLO BOB 








THE EDITOR SNEAKS 



REAR VIEWS»»> 




V <\\_ 




NOW SLIM!»» 



'ALF AN D 'ALF » » » 




*$§ 






& 


rfj 






HHS# ^^ ' 


iUJM 


* 

i *4 



J ^k 



r — Qulliver-'s Jvavels 
through Southioestem-igji 




King 

Culavell 

Henslee 



Oltorf 
Harris 
Allen 



Johns 

Weir 

Cortes 




KAPPA ALPHA 

Founded, 1865, Washington and Lee University 

Colors: Crimson and Gold Flower: Magnolia and Red Rose 



Fratres in Universitate 



EL W. Cortes 
Harry Henslee 
Paul Culwell 
Frank Turner 
Louie Oltorf 
Chester Allen 



Howard Weir 
Lloyd Johns 
Ed Barcus 
Charles Frederick 
James Harris 
Glenn Terry 



jSou'tocstcr 




Terry 

Turner 

Pennington 



Hollo way 

Lunsford 

Smith 

Frederick 
Thomas 
Morgan 
Brent 



I. J. McCook 



KAPPA ALPHA 
Xi Installed 1883 

F rat res in Urbe 
D. K. Carter 



W. R. Mood 



Alumnus Advisor — I. J. McCook 
Faculty Advisor — R. W. Tinsley 



Rorert P. Brent 
William M. Smith 
Ernest Morgan 
Marion B. Thomas 



Pledges 



Clarence Foster 
Claude Lunsford 
Cecil Pennington 
Oltorf Holloway 



^ou'tocster 



Sharp 

Bi ss 
Bell 



Smith 

Secrest 

Oatman 

McDaniel 

Stump 

Sterling 

Daniel 
Carter 
DeWitt 




PHI DELTA THETA 

Founded 1848, Miami University 



Colors: Argent and Azure 



D. W. Wilcox 
R. L. Logan 
D. K. Wilcox 

T. C. Sharp 
Leroy Buss 
J. E. Bell 
P. G. Secrest 
Wilburn Oatman 



Flower: White Carnation 



Fratres in JJrbe 



Sam Stone 
Walter Young 

Fratres in Universitate 

Moran McDaniel 
William Stump 
Fred B. Sterling 
Doran Oatman 



jSou'tocster 




Lukd 
Bone 
Huitt 

Peterman 
Shaddock 
Walton 

Parker 

SwiCKHEIMER 

Brown 

Davis 

Van Dresar 

Ross 



PHI DELTA THETA 
TEXAS GAMMA installed 1886 



King Vivion 
W. C. Vaden 
P. P. Young 



Fratres in Facilitate 

H. L. Gray 



Pledges 



David Daniels 
Gill DeWitt 
Sam Laird 
Ralph Huitt 
R. L. Shaddock 
W. W. Parker 
Warren Brown 
d alton vandresar 
Dave Williams 



L. J. Waggoner 



James Carter 
Alton Smith 
Jack Bone 
Willard Peterman 
George Walton 
g. g. swickheimer 
Warren Davis 
Lynn Ross 
Kenneth Crawford 



jSou'tocster 



Barrett 
Erskine 
Whiteside 

Buchholz 

Porter 

Kurth 

Strauss 
Van Dresar 
Bledsoe 




KAPPA SIGMA 

Founded at University of Virginia 1869 



Colors: Scarlet, White and Emerald Green 

Fratres in Urbe 
S. A. Hodges 
M. F. Smith 
F. C. Smith 
C. H. Harris 
0. W. Cardwell 



Flower: Lily of the Valley 



Fratres in Universitate 
W. B. Barrett 
W. D. Whiteside, Jr. 
Roy Kurth 
G. H. Porter 
Ransom Buchholz 



^ou'tatster 




Gray 

Borden 

dornbluth 



Moore 

Allen 

Wacker 

Baker 
Noble 
Price 
Todd 



KAPPA SIGMA 
IOTA Installed 1886 

Frater in Facullate 
E. L. Hardin 



M. U. Borden 
Murff Bledsoe 
Gordon Noble 
Louis Price 
Alva Baker 
Jack Todd 
Curtis Gunn 
Paul Dornbluth 



Pledges 



Milton Gray 
Harry Allen 
Robert Purl 
Harry Moore 
Arthur Wacker 
William Strauss 
Donald Van Dresar 
J. W. Hooker 



j&ou'ttiester 



Seaman 
Cook, E. 
Langford 



Wiggam 

Driskill 

Murray 



Cook, J. 

McKenzie 

Thomas 




PI KAPPA ALPHA 
Founded May 1, 1868, University of Virginia 



Colors: Garnet and Old Gold 



Flower: Lily of the Valley 



Fratres in Universitate 



Frank Driskill 
Elgin Cook 
Clarence Wiggam 
Ralph Hamme 



W. P. Murray 

Vance Seaman 
Herman Sullivan 
Buster Langford 



jSou'uocstcr 




Smith, G. 
Oldham 



Hamme 

Booth 

Story 



Gee 
Price 
Smith, G.W. 



PI KAPPA ALPHA 
Alpha Omicron Established Nov. 10, 1910 



Frater in Facilitate 
C. M. Edens 

Alumnus Advisor 
Tass D. Waterston 

Victor Collins 
Fred McKenzie 
C. H. Gee 
Henry Price 
Con Thomas 



Pledges 



Frater in Urbe 
Tass D. Waterston 

Faculty Advisor 
C. M. Edens 

George W. Smith 
George Smith 
Wesley Booth 
B. Glenn Story 
Beaty Oldham 



Jack Cook 



SotTtocster 



AVRIETT 

Berger 
Chreitzberg 

Isaacs 

Edwards 

Harris 

Engbrock 

Whitten 

Howell 




PHI MU 



Founded, 1852, Macon, Georgia 



Colors: Old Rose and White 



Patn 



Mrs. Lee Hall 
Mrs. G. C. Hester 
Mrs. Joe McInnis 
Mrs. S. T. Atkins 
Mrs. R. L. Galloway 
Mrs. E. M. Chreitzberg 
Mrs. Robert Isaacs 



Floiver: Enchantress Carnation 



Mrs. F. D. Love 
Mrs. M. L. Williams 
Mrs. Bessie Stancell 
Mrs. Stiles Byrom 
Mrs. A. C. Brizendine 
Mrs. A. Harris 
Mrs. P. B. Branch 



Enid Avriett 
Marie Berger 
Nelle Harris 



Sorores in Universitate 



Edwina Chreitzberg 
Elizabeth Edwards 
Lucinda Mae Isaacs 



jSou'tocstcr 




Quick 

Bauman 

Smith 

P. Harris 

Sanders 
Conner 

M. Harris 

Lanier 

Purcell 



XI KAPPA 

Installed 1906 

Sorores in Urbe 
Miss Frances Love Mrs. Herman Sullivan 

Mrs. Hobson Martin Mrs. R. M. Nall 

Mrs. D. B. Wood Miss Mildred Stancell 

Sorores in Facilitate 
Mrs. Anita Storrs Gaedcke 



Hazel Quick 
Thomasine Howell 
Pauline Harris 
Doris Smith 
Fern Whitten 
Goldie Purcell 



Pledges 



Ella V. Lanier 
Anne Bauman 
Marie Harris 
Grace Conner 
Chiqueta Sanders 
Gladys Engbrock 



^ou'ttjcsttr 



Cavitt 
Cox 

lloi.MES 



Ray 

N. Holland 

Thornton 

Heath 

Browning 

Martin 

Elliott 
Hodges 
Chambers 




ALPHA DELTA PI 

Founded, 1851, Macon, Georgia 

Colors: Blue and White Flower: Violet 

Patronesses 
Mrs. I. J. McCook Mrs. Claud Howard 

Mrs. Eldredge Hodges Mrs. II. N. Graves 

Mrs. Rita McClain Mrs. Harry Dolan 

Mrs. W. L. Price Mrs. H. T. McCollum 

Sorores in Universitate 
Dorothy Cavitt Clovis Cox 

Nan Holland Lucille Hodges 

Marion Holmes Mary Kuhn Browning 

Lois Thornton Willie Lee Heath 

Ruth Martin Catherine Ray 

Seawillow Pipkin Edna Holland 

Florence Elliott Florence Chambers 



^ou'tocstcr 




Pipkin 

Neyland 

Washburn 



Haag 

Casbeer 

Still 

GlLLUM 

Foster 
Wherry 

E. Holland 

DeBardeleben 

Jones 



ALPHA DELTA PI 

Sorores in Urbe 



Mrs. Roy Richardson 
Mrs. Emmett Cook 
Mrs. Henry Price 
Mrs. Etah Flanagan 
Miss Imogene Sutton 
Mrs. Paul Young 



Miss Johnnie Wright 
Miss Elizabeth Hodges 
Miss Agnes Wilcox 
Miss Molly Davis 
Mrs. W. P. Hoffman, Jr. 
Miss Madge C. Quebedeaux 



Mrs. Mable Taylor Quebedeaux 
Pledges 

ClIERRILLE DE BARDELEBEN LoRAINE STILL 

Addilese Haag Mary Ruth Casbeer 

Edith Foster Lolita Washburn 

Ernestine Jones 
Promises 
Mary Emma Neyland Mildred Gillum 

Frances Wherry Elaine Cocke 



jSou'toester 



Thompson 
Hardin 

>iu\i 



Moses 

Wilcox 

Dayvault 



^ in \<; 
\\ n in it 
Sparger 



Carter 
Hardin 

\ NDI U^ciN 




ZETA TAU ALPHA 
Founded 1898, Farmersville, Va. 

Lamda Installed 1906 



Colors: Turquoise Blue and Steel Gray 



Mrs. C. S. Griffith 
Mrs. R. A. Nichols 
Mrs. E. G. Gillett 
Mrs. W. J. Davis 



Cathryn Carter 
Elizareth Dayvault 
Aleen Hardin 
Reba Young 



Patronesses 
Mrs. W. H. Moses 
Mrs. D. K. Porter 
Mrs. E. L. Hardin 
Mrs. W. G. Johns 

Sorores in Universitate 
Louise Hardin 
Marie Moses 
Frances Stone 



Flower: White Violet 



Mrs. D. W. Wilcox 
Mrs. R. J. Stone 
Mrs. W. J. Burcham 



Mary E. Sparger 
Lillian B. Thompson 
Mary Wilcox 



jSou'tocstcr 




Baten 
Bryan 

Hill 



Johns 

Prather 

Bowe 



Samuells 

Sneed 

Wilcox 



Pivito 
Leggett 
Woodson 
Pehkins 



ZETA TAU ALPHA 

Sorores in Vrbe 



Laura Gillett 
Lorena Moses 



Tula Lee Stone 

Mrs. Lawrence Starnes 



Lorna Anderson 
Ruby Mae Baten 
Dorothy Bryan 
Jane Marie Hill 
Lois Johns 



PLEDGES 
Ruth Leggett 
Nelda Prather 
Gertrude Rowe 
Frances Samuells 



Margaret Sneed 
Julia Mary Wallace 
Davine Wilcox 
Helen Woodson 



Mary Jane Burnet 
Fairfax Moody 



PROMISES 

Patty Perkins 

Bessie Margaret Pivito 



jSoo'toester 



Flynn 

Baskin 

Batte 

SCHOFF 

E. Raetzsch 
Curry 
Webb 
Wylie 

Rives 

Tipton 

Ray 

MoNDRICK 

II \di:> 
Nall 
Pickett 
Doering 

Cook 
Stewart 
Cooper 
Fox 




DELTA DELTA DELTA 

Founded 1888, Boston, Mass. 
Colors: Silver, gold and blue Flower: Pansy 

Tri Delta Alliance 
Mrs. F. C. Smith Miss Bernice Huffstutler 

Mrs. R. L. Logan Mrs. H. O. Whitehurst 

Mrs. C. 0. Beaver 

Sorores in Universitate 



Harriet Flynn 
Dinks Baskin 
Evelyn Raetzsch 
Mary Belle Batte 
Mary Beulah Cook 
Laura Curry 
Alleen Pickett 



Anna Schoff 

Annie M\rie Doering 

Allise Wylie 

Sue Webb 

Ethel Green 

Blossom Nall 



jSou'toestcr 




McKlNNEY 

Davis 

Newberry 

Lawhorn 

Karback 

Ransom 

Bridges 

M. Shannon 

J. Shannon 
Howard 

C. Raetzsch 
Bennett 

Hicks 
Stocklas 
Hughes 
Secrest 

Korges 

D. Smith 
King 
Johnson 



Miss Helen Brewer 



DELTA DELTA DELTA 

Theta Epsilon installed 1911 

Sorores in Facilitate 
Miss Laura Kuykendall Miss Mary E. Fox 



Lola Haden 
Ruth Tipton 
Maxin Ray 
L. Mondrick 
Ruth Rives 
J. Shannon 
Evelyn Ransom 



Marie Shannon 
Virginia Stewart 
Francis Hicks 
Louise Stocklas 
Anna C. Cooper 
Elizabeth King 
Helen Korges 



Pledges 

Dorothy Bridges 
Elva R. Lawhorn 
Laverne Secrest 
Mary Davis 
Erna Karback 
Annie Dea Smith 
C. Raetzsch 



Mary C. McKinney 

Promises 
Ludell Howard 
Ruth Hughes 
Vaudine Johnson 
Elizabeth Jones 
Ruth Jones 



^oiTtoter 



Barrett 
Porter 



Secrest 
Sharp 



Oltorf 
Cortes 



Wiggam 
Dbiskiix 




MENS PANHELLENIC 

The Men's Panhellenic of Southwestern University is composed of two repre- 
sentatives from each of the four fraternities. The PanHellenic meets once a month 
to discuss the different inter-fraternity problems which may happen to arise. 

The Pan-Hellenic sponsors a smoker for fraternity men once a year and also 
inter-fraternity athletics which enable the different groups to become better 
acquainted and to promote a better understanding between the various groups. 

The Pan-Hellenic regulates the rushing of freshmen at the beginning of school 
and issues date cards for the benefit of all concerned. 

The Pan-Hellenic has discussions from time to time with the Administration 
and with the traveling secretaries of the various chapters which enable them to 
get a few ideas which the faculty have and also some ideas from the chapters other 
than at Southwestern. 



j&ou'tocstcr 




AVRIETT 

Harms 



Browning 
Cavitt 



Raetzsch 
Flinn 



Stone 

Musis 



WOMEN'S PANHELLENIC COUNCIL 

The Women's Pan-Hellenic council which is composed of two representatives 
from each of the four sororities on the campus, Delta Delta Delta. Phi Mu, Zeta 
Tau Alpha and Alpha Delta Pi, serves as a governing body dealing with inter- 
sorority problems. It makes and enforces such regulations as are necessary. 
The Council sponsors during the year a Pan-Hellenic tea for all the women of the 
University. This year the council with the aid of each of the sororities, has been 
influential in getting a number of prominent women as speakers on the campus. 



jSou'toestcr 



BRIEF HISTORY OF FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES 

Southwestern University, which recently celebrated its fifty-seventh anniversary, is the suc- 
cessor of four other institutions of Learning founded at various times by the Methodist Church of 
Texas — Ruterville College, McKenzie College, Wesleyan College, and Soule University. In 1874 
Rev. Francis A. Mood obtained a charter for Southwestern University which was located in 
Georgetown. Dr. Mood is called the founder of Southwestern for which he served faithfully until 
his death in 1884. 

On the Campus of the thriving little school different organizations began to exist and among 
them were the Fraternities and Sororities. The first of these was the Xi Chapter of Kappa Alpha 
Fraternity which was founded in Southwestern University on November 28, 1883, with six 
Charter Members. R. C. Porter, W. C. McKaney, T. L. Crow, W. E. Hawkins, E. W. Martin and 
E. Embree, Jr. 

Several years later the Texas Gamma Chapter of Phi Delta Theta Fraternity was founded. 
On March 12, 1886 A. R. Johns, R. L. Penn, M. K. Pateman, A. J. Perkins, W. H. Anderson, 
J. R. Hawkins, Abonn Holt, J. E. Quarles, J. H. Williams, R. S. Carter and S. J. Thomas were 
granted the Charter. 

On October 12, 1886 Iverson B. Love, Jessie C. Baker, Jasper B. Gibbs and John Stanley Moss 
were granted the Charter for the Iota Chapter of Kappa Sigma which is the twenty-first Chapter 
in American Kappa Sigmas. 

On November 12, 1910 Alpha Omicron Chapter of Pi Kappa Alpha was granted a charter by 
the Supreme Council of the Fraternity. The charter members were: A. D. Voight, Samuel A. 
Grogan, C. M. Singleton, J. M. McGuire, M. T. Waggoner, G. D. Chapman, and O. O. Mickle. 

The Fraternities had been progressing rapidly but not until 1906 were the Sororities more than 
secret lodges and local organizations. Among the first of these was Lamda Chapter of Zeta 
Tau Alpha which was granted its charter on May 13, 1906. The Charter members were: Elizabeth 
Hardy, Bess Whittle, Allie Barcus, Pauline Clark, Jean Whittle, Louise Gibson, Bosina Nelson, 
Rannie Collier, Myrtice Nelms. Lola Branson, Blossom Pittman, Irene Gammill, Edith Branson, 
Hazel Whittle, Katherine Fiser, Sunshine Dickerson, Bess Bailey, Lena Mae Nelms, Ena Dent, 
and Clara Wellborn. 

The Zeta Chapter of Alpha Delta Pi was not granted its charter until February 1907, although 
this organization was the first on Southwestern Campus. Mary Mann, Madge Cooper, Gladys 
Graves, Early Price, Gladys Snyder, Martha Sanders, Nannie B. Clamp, Mabel Taylor, Gene 
Daughtrey, Louise Bedford and Catherine Chessleer were the charter members. 

The local Xi Kappa was organized in Southwestern in 1906 but was not chartered until May 1, 
1908 as the Xi Kappa Chapter of Phi Mu. Thirteen girls were initiated as charter members: Annie 
Bankright, Mary Inez Coon, Ola Niece, Minnie Lee Taulman, Mabel Grace Daughterly, Mary 
Elizabeth Hanover, Jessie Sessions, Katherine Howard, Alline Terrell Smith, Jimmie Smyth, 
Bertha McKee, Eula Mae Rollins, and Julia Mangum. 

The last of the four Sororities that are now on the campus to receive their charter was Theta 
Epsilon Chapter of Delta Delta Delta. The Charter was granted September 5, 1911 and among 
the charier members were: Madge Hendry, Ann Carter, Ella Sedberry, Bess Crutchfield, Sadie 
Hudson, Hazel Barnes, Cornelia Hightowner, Lucy May Agnew, Hallie Louise Crutchfield, 
Pauline Swafford, Kit tie Cain, Norma Smith, Katherine Mitchell, Gladys Lockett, Mary Kath- 
leen Rose, Edna Maud Brown and Mary Wills. 

Both the Fraternities and Sororities have been progressing throughout the years and at the 
present all have a splendid standing. 



jSou'tocstcr 



/o*-j>&* fisiG.s ^LL-t/we ), W(/ 



efr 



KftLL - 1 1 »v(v 










«^H 



p'fev-j*.^ 



EXTRA-CURRICULAR 
ACTIVITIES 



Shelton Durrenberger President 

Clyde Whittle Vice-President 

Anna Marie Doering Secretary-Treasurer 



STUDENTS" ASSOCIATION 




The Students" Association of Southwestern University comprises every regularly 
registered student in residence at the institution. The constitution of the Asso- 
ciation includes provisions for the organization, officers, officers of student publi- 
cations, executive committee, nominating committee and the honor system. 

The officers of the Association are elected on the second Tuesday of May to 
act for the following school year. The editors and managers of the three publi- 
cations of the Association are elected in the first week of February. 

The nominating committee is composed of the officers of the Students' Association 
the heads of the staffs of the three publications: namely, the Sou'wester, the 
Megaphone, the Southwestern Magazine and the Executive Committee. 

The honor system, controlled by the Students' Association, presumes that every 
student is a lady or a gentleman. Certain violations of the code of honor are defined 
in the constitution and are punishable if a student is convicted before the Council 
of Honor. This Council is composed of nine members: four seniors, three juniors, 
and two sophomores. 

The Students' Association serves to unify and govern the many campus activ- 
ities. 



jgoiftocstcr 



Briten Norwood 
Alton Smith 



William P. Murry 
P. G. Secrest, Jr. 



Evelyn Raetzsch 
Glenn Terry 
Lola Haden 




THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
ARTICLE III 
(From Students' Association Constitution) 
Section 1. (a) The Students' Association shall elect an executive committee. 

(b) This committee shall be composed of seven members, at least three of whom 
shall be seniors. 

(c) The president of the Students' Association shall be ex-officio chairman of 
the executive committee. 

(d) The executive committee shall receive and examine the reports of the publi- 
cations and shall exercise such authority as the Students' Association shall delegate 
to it. 

The executive committee is usuallv elected the first week of the Fall Term. 



jSou'toestcr 



Temple 
Curry 



Lehmberg 
Whittle 




Matthews 
Stump 

Franklin 

Dunn 

Baskin 



THE UNIVERSITY HONOR COUNCIL 
Article V 

Section 1. The honor system assumes that every student is a gentleman or a lady 
and requires that he or she shall act as such in every college activity. Any violation 
of this principle in any phase of college life is a violation of the honor system. 

Section 2. All members of the student body are honor bound to take cognizance 
of and report to a member of the Honor Council any violation of any principle in- 
cluded in the scope of the honor system. 

Section 5. Each student shall take the following pledge, with his signature, on 
every examination or test paper or on any other material that the instructor may 
designate: "I pledge my honor that I have neither given nor received help on this 
test (or examination), nor have I seen anyone else do so." Any student that fails to 
sign such a pledge in full must state his reasons for not doing so. 

Section 6. Honor Council, (a) There shall be an Honor Council, known as the 
Southwestern University Honor Council, consisting of nine members. 

(b) The members shall be elected as follows: The senior class shall elect four 
representatives, the junior class shall elect three representatives, the sophomore 
class shall elect two representatives. The respective classes shall elect their repre- 
sentatives during the first two weeks of the Fall Term. 

(c) A man from the senior class who is a representative to the Honor Council 
shall be elected president of the Council by its members at the regular meeting in 
the Fall Term. 



jSou'tocstcr 




Whittle 
durrenberger 



Secrest 
Keyser 



FOERESTER 

Sri doh 



Murray 
Aronson 



MOOD HALL HONOR COUNCIL 

The Mood Hall Honor Council is the official body through which the boys of 
Mood Hall govern themselves. The self-government association of the Hall is 
founded on the honor system and residents of the Hall are honor bound to report 
violations of regulations to the Honor Council. Its duties are to enforce the regula- 
tions outlined in the Mood Hall constitution. Its goal is to help in establishing a 
more efficient honor system and to better the living conditions at Mood Hall. 



j&ou'toester 



Lehmberg 

James 

Cavitt 

Dickerson 

Dicken 

gorzycki 

Sparger 
Elliott 
Berger 
Wood 

Curry 
Avriett 
Flinn 
Thompson 




THE WOMAN'S BUILDING HONOR COUNCIL 

The Woman's Building Honor Council is composed of twelve girls elected from 
the three upper classes and charged with the duty of judging the cases of miscon- 
duct of women living within the Woman's Building. 



Ethyl Lehmberg. 
Eunice James. . . . 



President 
. Secretary 



Dorothy Cavitt 

Enid Avriett 

Harriett Flinn 

Lillian Blanche Thompson 

Mary Emerson Sparger 



Laura Curry 
Marie Berger 
Florence Elliott 
Louise Dicken 
Leta Wood 



Lillian Gorzycki Night Supervisor 

Doris Dickerson Night Supervisor 



jSou'toester 




J. E. Bell 

Editor-in -Chief 

T. C. Sharp 

Business Manager 

Boot he 



Bowles 

E. Raetzsch 

D. Van Dresar 



Richeson 
Bryan 
Carter 
DeWitt 



1931 SOU'WESTER 

J. E. Bell Editor-in-chief 

T. C. Sharp, Jr Business Manager 

J. Wesley Boothe Assistant Editor 

Evelyn Raetzsch Snap Shot Editor 

Dorothy Bryan Art Editor 

Cathryn Carter Assistant Snap Shot Editor 

Herschel Richeson Classes Editor 

Gill DeWitt Sports Editor 



^ou'toester 



Lawrence Allison 
Editor-in -Chief 

Edgar Allamon 
Business Manager 

Murray 

Terry 

E. Raetzsch 

Nall 

Browning 

DeWitt 

N. Harris 

Haden 

McAuliffe 

Shannon 



Carter 
Stocklas 
Morgan 
Shore 




THE MEGAPHONE 

Lawrence Allison Editor-in-chief 

Edgar Allamon Business Manager 

William P. Murray Assistant Editor 

Evelyn Raetzsch 4ssistant Editor 

Joe McAuliffe Assistant Editor 

Gill DeWitt Sports Editor 

Marie Shannon Society Editor 

Louise Stocklas Society Editor 

Cathryn Carter Club Editor 

Mary Kuhn Browning Social Editor 

Nelle Harris Sorority Editor 

Blossom Nall Proof Reader 

Lola Haden Proof Reader 

Glenn Terry Assistant Business Manager 

Ernest Morgan Assistant Business Manager 

J. W. Shore Circulation Manager 



jgou'tocstcr 




FONTAIN ErSKINE 

Editor-in -Chief 

Kermit Gibbons 
Business Manager 

Raetzsch 

Whiteside 
Elznor 

Flynn 
Haden 



Hill 

Aronson 

Bridges 

Nall 



THE SOUTHWESTERN MAGAZINE 

Fontain Erskine Editor -in -chief 

Kermit Gibbons Business Manager 

Hariet Flynn Assistant Editor 

Dorothy Lee Bridges Assistant Editor 

Lola Haden 4ssistant Editor 

Blossom Nall Assistant Editor 

Clarice Raetzsch Assistant Editor 

Duncan Whiteside Assistant Editor 

Janie Marie Hill Assistant Editor 

Eli Aronson Asst. Bus. Mgr. 

Whitlow Elzner Asst. Bus. Mar. 



^ou'toester 




Aronson 
Whittle 
Mink 

Coston 

LOWRY 

Yun 

Booth 

Bennett 

Gr\y 

Pittman 
Gibbons 

McAuLIFFE 

Smith, A. 



Y. M. C. A. 

The local Y.M.C.A. is a part of the movement of Young Peoples Christ : an 
Association. The purpose and ideal of the Y.M.C.A. is to bring the campus to a 
higher plane of living, to seek and to help others seek, through faith in Jesus Christ, 
an answer to the problems that confront the student in his daily rounds, to stim- 
ulate real thinking on the part of each individual student on his relationship with 
his fellow student and with God and make that relationship a little closer and more 
satisfactory than before. In short to help each student find the highest and best in 
life through a practical application of the teachings of Jesus in every relationship. 

The Y. room in Mood Hall is used as reading and play room, and is equipped 
with books, magazines, games, a piano and a ping-pong table and a small room in 
the rear is used as a gymnasium. A students handbook is published at the beginning 
of each year for the benefit of the new students, finding employment for those 
desirous of work, and in cooperation with the Y.W. sponsors a "get acquainted 
week of socials and receptions." 



jSou'toestcr 




Lehmberg 

Wood 

Curry 

Clark 

Cavitt 

James 
Doering 

SCHOFF 

Elliott 
Dickerson 

Love 

Avriett 

Raetzsch 

DlCKEN 

Carter 



Y.W. C. A. 

Y. W. C. A. CABINET 

La Nellb Love President 

Ethel Stinson Vice President 

Eunice James Council Representative 

Enid Avriett Corresponding Secretary 

Cathryn Carter Recording Secretary 

Anne Marie Doering Treasurer 

Laura Curry 

Dorothy Cavitt Devotions 

Evelyn Raetzsch 

Leta Wood Recreation 

Louise Dicken 
Anna Schoff 

Frances Johnson Music 

Ethyl Lehmberg 

Eddie Mae Clark Social Service 

Doris Dickerson 

Margaret Davis Missionary 

Florence Elliott Publicity 

Tomasine Howell House and Rooms 

The Young Women's Christian Association sponsors a fourfold training for 
the college girl — spiritual, intellectual, physical and social. In stressing this para- 
mount feature, all members "unite in creative life through a growing understanding 
of God." 



jSou'toester 



LOWRY 

Wyatt 
Davis 

James 
Wood 
Simpson 

Nicholson 
Caldwell 
Edwards 
Kennedy 

Horger 
Wedemeyer 
Johnson 
Booth 




EPWORTH LEAGUE CABINET 

Dick Lowry President 

Eddie Wyatt Vice President 

Emma Alice Nicholson Secretary 

Juanita Johnson Corresponding Secretary 

Warren Davis Treasurer 

Margaret Caldwell Librarian 

Leora Horger 

Ellsworth Brooks Music 

Elizabeth Edwards Publicity 

George Bennett Freshman Counselor 

Eunice James 

Wesley Booth First Department Superintendent 

Mary Maud Wedemeyer Second Dept. Superintendent 

Ruth Kennedy Third Department Superintendent 

Leta Wood Fourth Department Superintendent 

Sue Simpson Hi League Counselor 



jSou'toester 




Love 

DlCKERSON 

Stinson 

VlVION 

Howard 
Hester 

James 

Flinn 

Butler 

Cotten 

Durrenberger 

Wisdom 



Wood 
Avrett 
Hodges 
Smith 

MUNK 

Wedemeyer 



Secrest 

Stump 

Deoring 

Fuller 

Baker 

Price 



THE SCHOLARSHIP SOCIETY 

Lanelle Love President 

Doris Dickerson Vice President 

Ethel Stinson Secretary-Treasurer 

The Scholarship Society aims to promote, stimulate, and recognize scholarship. 
The top ranking tenth of the Junior and Senior Classes are eligible for membership. 
Good character and reputation are essential qualifications for entrance. 

The colors of the Society are emerald green and sapphire blue. Each member is 
entitled to wear a key in the form of a shield, and bearing a lamp representing the 
light of knowledge and truth. 

It is the custom of the Society to award a dictionary to the Freshman attaining 
the highest average in his or her work during the year. A speaker is invited at some 
time during the year to speak on some phase of scholarship. 



;©ou'toc8ter 




1 



VI 



This spring some of the one act plays directed bv the Director's Class will be pro- 
duced under Mr. Hardin's guidance. The four selected are "Spot Cash," by Eliza- 
beth Yates; "When Witches Ride" by Elizabeth Gay, "The Londonderry Air" by 
Rachael Field and "Judge Lynch" by J. W. Rogers, Jr. 

Those composing the present Mask and Wig Group are: Lena Baskin, Joseph 
Bowles, II. W. Cortes, Clovis Cox; Ruby Cooper, Laura Curry, Anne Marie Doer- 
ing. Carter Fuller. Nelle Harris, James Harris. Louise Hardin, Willie Lee Heath, 
Ruth Leggett, Marie Moses, Beatty Oldham, Duncan Whitesides, Leta Wood, 
Clarence Wiggam, Wailes Gray, Billy Stump, Evelyn Raetzsch, Anna Schoff, Mil- 
ton Gray, Kathryn Carter, Buster Langford, Aleen Hardin, and Mary Elizabeth 
Fox. 

Mr. Buster Langford heads the Southwestern group of National Collegiate Players. 




j&ou'tocster 




THE MASK AND WIG PLAYERS 

The Mask and Wig Players, under the direction of Mr. Ernest Hardin of the 
Speech Department have had a remarkably successful year. The Mask and Wig 
Players of Southwestern are members of National Collegiate Players, a national 
honorary dramatic fraternity which goes by the Greek letters Pi Epsilon Delta. 

The Players produced the following one act plays during the winter term: 
"Suicide," Conrad Seiler; "Chimes of Santa Cruz" by James O'Brien; "Coral 
Beads" by Elizabeth Hall Yates; "Curses What a Night," Sidney Steel and "Plum 
Distracted" by Kathryn Tarver of Southwestern Faculty. 

The winter offering was Ibsen's "A Doll's House." All the cast were well selected 
for their characterizations and the performance was a worthy effort artistically 
accomplished. 




jSou'toester 



Matthews 
Imanuel 

CoNNERLY 
LOWERV 

Monk 



Mc Daniels 

Wood 

Pitman 

Baumfalk 

Gibbons 



Jordon 

McCoombs 

Galbreath 

Ryan 

Rysinger 

Clark 



Dunn 

H. McDaniels 

Coleman 

Wyatt 

J. H. Gibbons 

Booth 




THE MINISTERIAL ASSOCIATION 

The activities of the Ministerial Association are so directed so as to best prepare 
the members along lines of common service for the church and humanity. Its mem- 
bership comprises those students who are enrolled in the ministerial school or who 
are preparing to engage in the field of religious work. 

The Association meets once a week, at which time devotionals are conducted, and 
talks are made either by members of the association or by someone of larger ex- 
periences. 

This year the Association has made great advances. It operates by a written 
constitution; a permanent record of all the meetings is kept; members of the As- 
sociation preach every Sunday in near by churches. 



Ill 



jSou'toestcr 




Price 
Caldwell 
Lewis 
Rumble 

Yun 
Baker 
Nickolson 
Wedemeyer 



Karback 

Smith 

Gorzycki 

Davis 

Lee 

Cox 

Wood 

Jones 

Clark 

Stinson 



LIFE SERVICE STUDENTS 

Thomas Price President 

Margaret Caldwell Vice President 

Margaret Lewis Secretary 



Foreign and Home Mission Students 



Chas. Rumble 
San Yan Yun 
Grace Baker 
Eunice Alice Nickolson 
Mary Maude Wedemeyer 
Marjorie Karback 
Dora Deane Smith 
Lillian Gorzycki 



Margaret Davis 
K. Y. Lee 
Mrs. 0. Giron 
Necia Mae Cox 
Leta Wood 
Eddie Mae Clark 
Lucy B. Jones 
Ethel Stinson 



jSou'toester 




Simpson 

Elliot 

Secbest 

DoBNBLUTII 

Cubby 

Pbice 

Womack 

SlIBADEB 

Nusom 

Dunn 

Debabdeleben 

Bakeb 

Still 
Kubth 

Nevvbebby 

Weathebby 

Pbice 

OSTBOM 
MOBGAN 

Cox 
Davis 
Black 
Tlibneb 

Stump 

Lane 

Watson 

Stocklass 

Wiley 

Pubcell 



SPANISH CLUB 
El Circulo Espanol 

Gladys Simpson President 

Josephine Elliott Vice President 

Laverne Secrest Secretary 

Paul Dornbluth Treasurer 

El Circulo Espanol was organized in January of last year under the direction of 
Miss Lucy Belle Morgan. The motive of the club is to create an interest in the cor- 
rect use of Spanish, to inspire a love for Spanish literature, to raise the standard of 
scholarship. The regular meetings are held every three weeks. The business meetings 
and programs are carried on in Spanish. The requirement for membership is an 
average of eighty-five percent. 



jgou'totcr 



iniiiiii^apiMiii 




'?* 


'■' -IB 


Si 




.' ; c 




Bryan, Karback, King, Gould, M. Shannon, Moody, Love, Pivito, Howard 
Sneed, Wilcox, J. Shannon 

THE RIDING CLUB 

The Riding Club under the leadership of Mr. O. W. Cardwell who is an ex- 
student consists of most of the girls who are interested in Horsemanship. 

Much enthusiasm is manifest by the numerous rides in the afternoon and moon- 
light which are taken under the supervision of Mr. Cardwell, visiting the various 
ranches around Georgetown and Round Rock. One of the favorite rides is along the 
South San Gabriel River on the Weir Ranch. 




McKinney, E. Raetzsche, Ray Harris, Secrest, C. Raetzsche, Cooper, 
Quick, A. Smith, Pickett, Washburn 



jSoo'toester 



EDITOR'S PAGE 

The book is out! Practically 12 months work finished 
and bound up in this the 1931 Sou'wester. This page 
is taken as a medium through which I may give proper 
credit and recognition to those who have helped me in 
my work and also express my feelings on the completion 
of the task. 

I wish to thank: Red Boothe, Red Reatzsche, Donald 
Van Dressar, Herschel Richeson, Jumbo Elzner, Cath- 
rine Carter, and the many friends of us all who were so 
kind to turn in to the Choker editor the dope so that we 
could have all the low down even if we did not use all 
that was sent. 

It has been the biggest pleasure that the editor has 
ever enjoyed and will be remembered forever as the 
one task he undertook and strove at all times to do the 
very best that he could. 

Well here it is, I have put my whole hearted effort 
into the task and that is all I can say. I am not so op- 
timistic as was Ben Jonson, I leave your opinion 
to your own judgment. 

J. E. Bell 



i^ou'tocstcr 



...Qullivers Jravelp 
through Southwestern- igyi 




COACH C. M. EDENS 



To Coach Edens this section of the Sou'wester is 
affectionately and respectfully dedicated. 

His unflagging loyalty and energy, his entire willing- 
ness, and his very earnestness have won our sincere re- 
spect. Moreover, his clear understanding of the problems 
that confront him at Southwestern and his never failing 
spirit of good fellowship, have gained him our deep 
and lasting regard. 



jSou'toestcr 




Wood, Chreitzberg, Cook, Johnson, DeBardeleben. Ware, Browning, Bryan 
Moses, Harris, Sparger, Howell, Hardin, M. Bay, Baetzsch, Quick 
Gould, Bennett, Davis, Anderson, Wilcox, Hughes, C. Bay, Johns 
Neyland, Schoff, Howard, Curry, Carter, Washburn, Sneed, Black. Gillum 



PEP SQUAD 



Beattv Oldii \m 



One of the most active and different organizations on the campus this year was 
the Pep Squad. The girls dressed in black skirts and pirate sweaters and appeared 
at each game played on Snyder Field, featuring between halves the formation 

of the letter "S." Following the formation 
of the letters S. U., the band and pep 
squad counter-marcbed across the field 
and returned in single file drill to the grand- 
stand. 

Here in the grand stand the pep squad 
formed the nucleus of the cheering section. 
Due credit must be given these thirty-six 
girls for their splendid spirit of co-operation 
and pep. 




jgou'tocstcr 




. SOUTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY TROPHIES 




'Red" Boothe 



Although there has never been a trophy case in the 
truest sense of the word at Southwestern, we are some- 
times in the habit of calling the collection of trophies 
that have come to us a part of the trophy case. 

Among the trophies that are to be found in the pos- 
session is the T. I. A. A. Football Championship for 
1925, and the Texas Conference Football Champion- 
ship for 1927, the year they celebrated their last meet- 
ing with Baylor University with a 19-6 win. 

Then we look farther and see the many shields that 
they have won for the mile relay in their conference. 
We see that they have two shields that were captured 
in the T.I. A. A. when it was considered impossible to 
beat Southwestern in the Conference mile relay in 
1924 and '25. Then we see that they entered the Texas 
Conference in 1926 and continued their wins in the re- 
lay. They won the shield in 1926, but in 1927 did not 
send a relay team to the meet, and that is the only con- 
ference relay that they have failed to win from 1924 
up to the present time. Altogether the Pirates tracksters 
have gathered together six trophies that stand for 
supremacy in the mile relay. 

Sharing a part of the space taken up by the collection 
of footballs with the score of memorable games written 
on them. In recent years there has been adopted on the 
campus the practice of giving loving cups for certain 
campus sports. 



;Sou'toc8txr 



INTRA-MURAL ATHLETICS 

The school year of 1930-31 was a banner year in the history of intra -mural 
sports on Southwestern Campus. For the past few years this type of athletics has 
been more or less dead and little enthusiasm has been manifested bv the students 
but not so this year, for the students got right in behind Physical Director R. J. 
"Cap"'" Kidd from the start and class rivalry has been rife ever since. 

Under the able supervision of Kidd, who was assisted by Beatty Oldham, the 
class teams were organized and each team had representatives in all sports including 
football, basketball and baseball. 

Using touch football as an able substitute for the gridiron game, the Freshmen 
squad, captained by Victor Collins, proved far superior to the other contestants 
and managed to come through the season without a loss. Only the Sophomores 
were able to cope with the fast passing attack displayed by the Fish. They received 
as their reward a beautiful silver loving cup that will adorn Southwestern^ trophy 
case as a fond remembrance of one of Southwestern^ greatest Freshmen's Squads. 

The next thing on the intra-mural program was basketball. Four teams were 
represented in this league, those being captained by Bill Murray, Tate Parker, 
Red Taylor and Frank Driskill. Competition was keen throughout the entire 
season. At the season's close Murray Snipers were proclaimed champions. This 
bunch of lads had gone through the entire schedule without a single defeat, while 
each of the other three teams were hot on their trail. Last year Taylor's team was 
victorious in this event. Many of these games were well attended and prospects are 
brilliant for an even more successful season next year. 

At the time the Annual goes to press the intra-mural baseball season is half 
over and it looks as if the Freshmen will again be victorious as they have gone 
through the entire first half without a single defeat, although the Juniors are on 
their heels and bid fair to overtake the Fish in the second half. The Freshmen 
team is captained by Hoss Ross, burly catcher. If one of the other teams do over- 
take the Fish in the last half, a Southwestern World Series will be held to decide 
the championship. 

All in all, the intra-mural season has been one of great success and will probably 
continue to do so in the years to come. 



;gou'tocstcr 




"£>• ^)«,^*N 



FOOTBALL 




WILLIAMS, CAPT. SEAMANS G. SMITH A. SMITH 

SCORES OF THE SEASON 

Rice 32 Southwestern 6 

Texas A & M 43 Southwestern 

Texas A & I Southwestern 

St. Edwards 19 Southwestern 20 

S.W.T.T.C. 13 Southwestern 

Simmons Southwestern 

Denton 13 Southwestern 13 

Austin College 12 Southwestern 13 

Trinity 6 Southwestern 7 

McMurray Southwestern 

Howard Payne 59 Southwestern 



;Sou'toester 




■•■iJa&i* 



c. „> 



>^*V'" >*, 








PENNINGTON 



SEASON 

Facing one of the stiffest schedules in the history of Southwestern, Coach Edens 
called some 40 odd candidates out for practice the early part of September and by 
hard labor and good coaching had his men whipped into fair shape for tbe opening of 
the 1930 season against Rice Institute at Houston. Edens possessed a wealth of ma- 
terial from the freshman class plus nine lettermen from the varsity of the preceding 
year. The injury to Captain Hess Williams earlv in the season was a great hindrance 
to Coach Edens in rounding his charges into Championship calibre. Williams injury 
also threw the entire generalship into tbe able hands of Vance Seamans, star quar- 
terback. An oddity of the season was the Pirates four games that ended in a dead- 
lock and three other conference victories won by the scant margin of one point. The 
Corsairs greatest win was their 20 to 19 victory over the strong Saint Edwards 
Saints while their championship game against Howard Payne on Thanksgiving Day 
found the boys badly off form. At the close of the season Captain pro-tem Vance 
Seamans and Johnny "Scrap Iron"" Mercer were named on the official All-Confer- 
ence eleven while on the second string, George Smith and Dave Williams were given 
places. All in all the season was considered one of success from every angle, the boys 
taking second place in the conference chase after being picked to fight it out for the 
cellar position. 



jSou'tocstcr 




JOHNSON 



FOEBSTEB 



LUNSFOBD 



D. WILLIAMS 



RICE 32— SOUTHWESTERN 6 

Opening of the season on September 20th found the Pirates in great form but un- 
able to cope with the splendid aggregation boasted of by Rice Institute. Playing on 
Rice Field, the Pirates found themselves on the short end of a 32-6 score, however 
little "Chatter" Allen and "Big Boy"" Geiscke were constant threats to the feath- 
ered Owls. Curtis Gunn, freshman back scored the lone touchdown for the Pirates on 
a pass from Seamans, but on the next play received a leg injury that laid him on the 
side lines for the remainder of the season. Prospects for the Corsairs looked un- 
usually bright for the coming season. 



TEXAS A & M 43— SOUTHWESTERN 

The following week Captain Hess Williams and his mates journeyed to Aggieland 
only to be swamped by a powerful crew of Coach Matty Bell's Aggies. The Cadets 
displayed a great offense that completely bewildered the lighter bunch of Pirates. 
Geiscke 's withdrawal from school and "Smitty" Smith's back injury proved 
stumbling blocks for Eden's charges. Chatter Allen, George Smith and "Red" 
Lawerence were the shining lights for the Canary and Black. This severe drubbing 
failed to dampen the spirits of the Pirates and they were commended highly upon 
their ability to "take it" against such overwhelming odds. 



jSoo'toester 




TEXAS A & I 0— SOUTHWESTERN 

Opening the 1930 home season under the newly installed lights of Snyder Field, 
the Pirates were forced to play the Arts and Industry eleven to a scoreless tie. This 
crew of Kingsvilleites put up a stubborn fight the entire route and refused to let a 
superior squad of Southwestern hall toters cross their line. George Smith on the of- 
fensive backed by Cecil Pennington, who played a whale of a defensive game, were 
the outstanding men for the Pirates, but the injury to Captain Hess Williams in this 
game laid him in the hospital for many weeks as well as placed a large hole in our 
left side of the line. 



ST. EDWARDS 19— SOUTHWESTERN 20 

The opening of the Texas Conference found the Pirates in great shape and they 
banded the strong Saint Edwards aggregation from Austin a 20-19 drubbing under 
the lights of Snyder field. This newly inaugurated night football has taken well in 
this part of Central Texas and has been a tremendous drawing card for the numer- 
ous spectators and followers of Southwestern. Chatter Allen and Jim McClure went 
great for the Pirates in this game while Smith, Mercer, Seamans and Foersteralso 
played bang up ball for the victors. This was, no doubt, the greatest victory scored 
by the Pirates during the Conference campaign. 



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LAWHKV i; 



S.W.T.T.C. 13— SOUTHWESTERN 

The Pirates ran into a determined crew of Southwest Texas Teachers College 
Bobcats when they engaged this bunch of scrappers at San Marcos. Though rated 
to defeat the cats by some thirteen or more points, the Corsairs found the tables re- 
versed and came home on the short end of the score. Throughout the entire game 
the Bobcats played far above their heads by putting up a stubborn defense plus pow- 
er in the offense. Meanwhile the Pirates had assumed a superior attitude and awoke 
to the business at hand onlv after it was too late. Probably the only outstanding man 
in the Pirates' 1 line-up was Jim McClure, a scrapping end, though every man in a 
Pirate uniform saw service in the fray. 

SIMMONS 0— SOUTHWESTERN 

Finding themselves badly outweighed from the start by the strong Simmons 
University Cowboys from Abilene, the Pirates put up one of their stiffest defensive 
battles of the season to hold the Cowhands to a scoreless tie. Edens' men had little 
chance to display any of their offense against their bigger rivals. The backbone of 
the Pirate defense lay in the superb exhibition displayed by Cecil Pennington, 
Hoss Ross, "Cordilly" May and Johnny Mercer, these lads put up a stubborn 
fight throughout the entire route to withstand the attacks thrust at our line by the 
classy Cowboys. 



;&ou'tocster 




DENTON TEACHERS 13— SOUTHWESTERN 13 



Catching the Pirates again on one of their off nights an inferior squad of Denton 
Teachers were ahle to hold the Pirates to a tie. Throughout the game it was evident 
of the superiority of the Corsairs but they failed to "get going" and were forced to 
suffer the consequences. With the possible exception of George Smith, powerful 
Canary and Black fullback, and "Ollie" Laird, guard, the entire team suffered a 
let down from the previous week. Thus far the Pirates seemed to let up on all their 
non -conference games and tighten down on those that counted in their standing. 



AUSTIN COLLEGE 12— SOUTHWESTERN 13 

By virtue of placing eleven men on the field that refused to admit defeat, the Pi- 
rates were able to gain a great 13 to 12 victory over the outstanding Austin College 
Kangaroo aggregation of Sherman. The game was packed with numerous thrills 
and an excited bunch of Pirate cohorts yelled throughout for the boys to give them 
a win. A vast improvement was seen in the team over the previous weeks game. 
This scrapping bunch of Canary and Black warriors were led by the sterling per- 
formances of Vic Foerster, Mercer, Seamans and George Smith, while every man 
that saw service in the tilt gave their best to bring us a victory. 



jgou'tocstcr 




WEAVER 



TRINITY 6— SOUTHWESTERN 7 

The age old adage held true the following week when the Pirates encountered the 
Trinity University Tigers at Waxahachie, that adage, that the best team always 
wins, was a rather hard one, for the Pirates had a scrap on their hand all of the way 
trying to convince the Tigers of the fact. Efforts were made to take the student body 
on a special train but this plan fell through for lack of funds. However the boys came 
through with a great 7 to 6 victory. Vance Seamans, Johnson, "Daddy" Weir and 
Claudie Lunsford turned in outstanding exhibitions for the Corsairs. 



McMURRAY 0— SOUTHWESTERN 

The following week found the Pirates engaging the great aggregation of Indians 
from McMurray College at Abilene. Before game time a strong 45 mile gale blew up 
across the prairie and the Pirates found themselves playing under conditions to 
which they were not accustomed. This storm rendered the Pirate passing attack help- 
less and without this means of an offense the Corsairs found themselves utterly at 
a loss. Unable to make gains through the Indian line, they were forced to another 
tie game. This also was a non-conference tilt and left the Pirates still in a tie with 
Howard Payne for the Conference Championship. 



j^ou'toester 




( . I MUM \s 



HOWARD PAYNE 59— SOUTHWESTERN 



With spirits high in anticipation over another chance to annex a Texas Conference 
Title, the Southwestern Pirates journeyed to Brownwood on Thanksgiving Day to 
engage the great Howard Payne Yellow Jackets on their home field. Evidently the 
Jackets maintained some of the same ideas about who should he champions for they 
displayed one of the most superb exhibitions of football seen in the Texas conference 
in many years. With Nig McCarver as their king-pin the Jackets out -passed, out- 
punted and generally out-played the Pirates in every department of the game. The 
Jackets held the whip hand over the lighter and less experienced Pirates throughout 
the entire game and seldom gave the Pirates an outside chance to show any of their 
"stuff." Though played on Thanksgiving Day it left little for the Pirates to be 
thankful of, for it blasted their hopes for a championship. Every man in a Pirate 
uniform saw service in the tilt, and every man tried his best to give us a win. but 
his best was far from good enough and few men could be classed as outstanding for 
the Corsairs. 



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INTER-FRATERNITY ATHLETICS 

As has been the eustom for the past number of years, the different fraternities 
on the campus have organized teams to represent them in their annual athletic 
league. Much interest has been shown throughout the entire year by the groups in 
this line of endeavor. 

The football championship was awarded to the Kappa Sigmas due to their 
19 to victory over the Phi Delta Thetas. This game represented the only two 
teams to compete on the campus and was played on Snyder Field before a large 
and enthusiastic crowd. 

Inter -fraternity basketball was next on the program and this went to the Pi 
Kappa Alpha squad captained by Frank Driskill. They went through the season 
without having a defeat registered on their side of the score board. They were 
given close competition throughout the season by the Kappa Alphas. Each fra- 
ternity played the other two games apiece. Though they won the preceding year, 
the Kappa Sigmas failed to place a winning aggregation on the floor as did the Phi 
Delta Thetas. though both teams gave the leader strong opposition in every game. 

Baseball is now holding sway but as yet is incomplete, though the Kappa Alphas 
are in the van by virtue of their wins over the Pi Kappa Alphas and the Phi Delta 
Thetas and only one more game to play. If they are victorious over the Kappa 
Sigmas they will have cinched the bunting, which is symbolic of the championship. 
The Pi Kappa Alphas were conceded the victor before the season got under way 
but were upset by the K.A. group. The Kappa Sigmas and the Phi Delta Thetas had 
strong teams but were unable to gain a decision over the leaders. 

Other inter-fraternity sports that are on the calendar for the remainder of the 
year are tennis, golf and track. Prognostications are at present that the Kappa 
Sigmas will grab the tennis title while the Phi Delts annex the golf and the track 
is a toss up between all four fraternities. 

A great deal of interest has been manifested throughout the entire season and 
it would be little surprising if next year was not an even greater year for fraternity 
athletics. 



^ou'tticstcr 




*.T2> 



««-H*N 



BASKETBALL 




Seamans 



Whittl 



G. Smith 



Williams 



For the past ten years the Southwestern University Pirate basketball team has placed eilher first or 
second in the conference ranking. This year under the excellent coaching of Coach "Lefty" Edens and 
the capable leadership of Captain Vance Seamans the black and canary warriors placed second. The 
only team that was able to defeat the Pirates was the Simmons Cowboys from Simmons University. 
The team defeated the Pirates first at Abilene, the stronghold of the Cowboys. The score was 27-25. 
This was one of the most exciting games ever played in \bilene. The Pirates led the Cowboys until the 
last few seconds when Bob McCullum broke loose for the Cowboys and won the game. This too was the 
first defeat the Pirates received in conference competition. 

To start the season the Pirates defeated Austin Athletic Club two games. Then the V. & M. boys 
came here for a two game series. The Pirates defeated them 2K-2 1 the first game in a two extra period 
game. This game was very ex?iting and showed the Pirate rooters what kind of a team we really had. 
The next game was won by the A. & M. boys 28-22. Then the Pirates dropped two games to the San 
M ar:os Bobcats. One here and one there. Each game was close and well played. Then Trinity and Austin 
College fell at the point of the sword held by the Pirates. Each game was won by a decisive score. Next 
the Pirates lost to Simmons 27-25 and the next night the Pirates gained revenge from the severe beating 
they received in football when they defeated the Howard Payne Yellowjackets. Next to fall victim of 
the Pirate sword was St. Edwards, Austin College, Trinity, Howard Payne, and St. Eds again. In all 
these games the Pirate defense was superb and the offense excellent. Each was won by a decisive score. 
The last game was the one to decide the championship. If the Pirates won they would lie for first place, 
if they lost they would get second place. The game was very exciting. The gym was crowded and every- 
one was very enthusiastic. When the gun sounded the score was 37-20 in favor of the Cowboys. The 
star of the game was Bob McCullum who scored 20 points. The game placed the Pirates in second 
place and gave the Cowboys the undisputed championship of the Texas Conference. 

Even though we did not win first place in the Conference much credit is due the 12 boys who worked 
faithfully every day in order to be able to have a strong team on the floor. Too much praise cannot be 
given these men for their hard work, sportsmanship, loyalty, and excellent playing. 



jgou'tocstcr 




Keyser 



At the start of the season the old letter men elected Vance Seamans as their captain. This position 
Vance capably filled. He was an excellent leader, fine sportsman, good player and hard fighter. We could 
always depend on Vance to give his best for his school and for his team. When his team was on the small 
end of the score, Vance immediately began to start the sword swinging and it wasn't long before the 
Pirates had command of the ship. This was the third letter Vance earned in basketball and we are sorry 
to say that he finishes. Vance will always be remembered as captain and star forward on the 1931 
S. U. basketball team. Vance also made all conference forward. 

Next is "Slim" Whittle, the boy who could always be depended on to gather his share of points. Slim 
made all conference center for the 3rd straight year. As a center Slim did not have an equal. He always 
got the tip off a majority of the time. When he did get the tip off it was almost a sure two points because 
George and Vance immediately started the fire works. "Slim" is a good sport and a good basketball 
player. Much praise should be given to "Slim." We are indeed sorry to say that "Slim" has finished 
his basketball career. His shoes will be hard to fill next year. We will always remember him as a good 
player and good sport and a gentleman. 

George Smith the other one of the scoring twins. George played forward with Vance. These two were 
called the scoring twins. This title was well placed because these two boys always added their part to the 
score. George was a good defensive and offensive man. He worked well with Vance and often times this 
combination meant defeat to the opposing team. 

"Hess" Williams the boy who lettered three years. The first as a forward, the next as a center and 
this year as a guard. This shows that "Hess" knew his basketball. It took Hess a good while to get 
accustomed to the guard position but once he did he filled the position well. Hess has played his last 
fame for us and we will miss his good playing on next year's team. Hess added a few points to the 
scoring column but not many but it was hard for a visiting man to make many when Hess was around 
and he wa* always there when he was needed. 



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^IBftfl 




Weaver 



A. Smith 



Weih 



A new man on the Pirate team was "Red" Taylor. Red came to us from Lon Morris. He played for- 
ward in Lon Morris but Coach Edens shifted him to guard at the beginning of the season. This was a wise 
choice because Red proved to be a valuable man. He could make points, cover the court and was an ex- 
cellent guard. Red made the scond team all conference team which is a good record. He could be de- 
pended on to give all he had for his school and learn. He never quit trying. We are indeed happy to say 
that Red has another year and he will help the strength of next year's team a great deal. 

A freshman who lettered was Alva Raker all slate forward from Reagan Hi, Houston. Raker has a good 
eye for the basket and was a good floor man. He displayed real basketball ability. Raker has three more 
years of basketball and we are expecting him lo develop into one of the best players in the conference. 

Smith, better known as "Smitty," added his second letter this year. He played in nearly all the games 
and could always be depended on to hold his own with the best. Smitty is a good basketball player and a 
good sport. We are sorry to say that he has completed his basketball career at S. U. We will miss him on 
next year's team a great deal. 

Even though Harley McDaniel didn't come to school until after the squad had been working out 
for a good while he proved to be a good enough player to letter and in order to letter one had to be good. 
"Mc" is a man who could be depended on to do his best and his best was good. Mc has one more year 
with us and we are glad indeed. His play will strengthen the team next year considerably. 

Weaver, a boy who worked hard all year but failed to letter, is a good player and he will be back next 
year and if someone don't watch out Weaver will make a letter because he has the stuff to do it with. 

"Duddy" even tho he did not letter he played in a good many games. Next year he will be back and 
will strengthen the team. 

Rurgin Dunn also failed to letter but it was not because he did not work. He worked hard and next 
year he will be back again working and we expect him to win a letter because he is really a good player. 

Keyser who reported for the first time for the squad made a good showing. He will be back next year 
and his presence will strengthen the team. 

Ml the 12 men really showed that they could play basketball and first class too. Each man is to be 
complimented on his fine playing. We are indeed proud of you individually and collectively 1931 
basketball team. 



jSou'tocstcr 




E>.^>K_vi WW 



TRACK 




WILLIAMS 



The 1930 Pirate Track squad under the capable coaching of Coach R. J. Kidd 
and the fine leadership of C. D. Fulkes, made an impressive record. Although the 
team as a whole did not win many meets the performance of individual stars was 
very unusual. The records made by the one mile relay team composed of Thomas, 
Story, McDaniels and Fulkes will always be remembered bv the students of 
Southwestern and also the boys from other schools who ran against this team. 
The relay team without a doubt was the strongest unit in the Pirate track squad. 
Their first competition was in the Texas Relays. In that meet our boys ran the re- 
lay in 3:32. This was exceptionally good since it was very early in the season. Here 
and at the invitation meet in Austin were the only times the team was defeated. 
In all the meets with other schools the relay team was never pushed to the limit. 
The only close race they had was with Sam Houston. Here the boys all displayed 
fine form in running the mile in 3:28. Then came the conference meet. In this meet 
the Pirates as a whole scored only a few points but the relay team stepped out to break 
the conference. The old record was 3:32 held bv a previous Pirate team. The new 
record, which our team set is 3:27. This shows how strong the team really was. 
Each man gained on their opponent and when the finish came Fulkes was ahead 
10 yards. 

The foremost personal of our team is C. D. Fulkes. C. D. Fulkes, the boy from 
Round Rock. He lettered two years in Lon Morris then came to Southwestern. 
The first year here he lettered. Then at the close of his first year here his team 
mates conferred upon him the greatest honor which is possible to be placed upon 
a track man. That honor was to lead the 1930 track team through a successful 
season. Captain Fulkes ran the hundred yard dash, threw the javelin, and was 
anchor man on the relay team. We could always depend on C. D. to carry the 
canary and black warriors on to victory. Besides being a good track man Fulkes 
possessed all the qualities necessary to be captain of an athletic team. He was ca- 



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MCDANIK1.S 



KIIHHSI I It 



GIESECKE 



pable, efficient, a good sport and a gentleman. He will always be remembered by us 
who knew him. 

In the weight department, Coach Kidd had the dependable Alton Smith. 
"Smitty," a letter man from previous years always gives his best to the team. 
We could always depend upon "Smitty" to gain his share of points in any meet. 
He always won first or second in the shot put or the discus. In the conference 
meet he showed up exceptionally well. We are indeed glad to say that "Smitty" 
will be back with us again next year. He improved with every meet and if he im- 
proves next year we are sure he will win first places in the conference meet. 

Hester Williams, a natural born athlete, was the one who did all the "timber 
topping" for our squad. In the Sam Houston meet he came in far ahead of the 
field to win first place. In every meet Hess was able to hold his own. He always 
made the opposing men put out all they had in order to defeat him. Hess still has 
another year of track and we all know he will do all he can toward making the 
1931 team a success. 

McDaniels, a two year man, ran the third lap in the relay. When Mc received 
the baton from Story he always increased the lead or held his own. Mc is a good 
440 man and always contributed his part in making the team one of the best 
Southwestern has ever had. Mc will always be remembered because of his cheerful 
smile. He will help make the relay team next year another record breaking machine. 

Forester, the German from Castell is the boy who upheld the Pirate squad in the 
distances. Although Vic did not win any first places, he always managed to give 
the opposing men a great race. Short, sturdy, and steady were the qualities which 
made him a valuable man to the 1930 track team. Vic will also be back next year 
to strengthen the team. 

Giesecke, the boy who came to the team from Angleton, where he tied for first 
place in the pole vault at the high school state meet, won most of his contests with 
other schools. Giesecke won the name "Singing Fool" because of his cheerful at- 
titude. He always made the opposing men know he was around because of his 



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singing, vaulting, etc. The only trouble he had was finding a vaulting pole that 
was large enough. Giesecke has three more years with the squad. 

Jim McClure, a good 880 man failed to letter not because he did not try. but 
because competition was too keen in that field. He worked very hard all year and 
ran in every meet but failed to place. Jim of course will be back with us next year 
giving all he has for a letter and to make the squad a success. 

Jesse Thomas, the lead off man in the relay, was the man who started the team 
on its record breaking journeys. Jesse always managed to give his team mates a 
good lead once the team got the lead the opposing teams were out of the running. 
Jesse finished and graduated and his absence will be felt very much by other mem- 
bers of the relay teams. Besides running in the relay, Jesse also ran the 440. In 
this he always gave his best. 

Glenn Story, a freshman who strengthened the relay team very much. He was 
the only new man on the relay team. He ran the second lap and always gave us a 
good lead. Even though a freshman he will always be remembered because of his 
fine sportsmanship and running ability. We are indeed glad to say that Story will 
be with us three more years and before he finishes he should develop into one of 
the best 440 men in the conference. 

May, the boy who gave "Smitty ,, all the competition he wanted, lettered in the 
weight also. May always pushed his opponents to the limit in order to win. May 
will be the one who will have to take Smitty's place. In one meet he defeated 
Smitty. This shows that May is a first class weight man. 

Ellsworth Brooks the tall boy from Bellville was the man who did the high 
jumping. He was able to hold his own with the best men in the conference. He won 
points in every meet. Brooks will be with the squad three more years and if nothing 
happens he will develop into one of the best high jumpers in the conference. 

AH things taken into consideration we are indeed proud of our track team. With 
the proper emphasis on track teams by the University student body and Adminis- 
tration, Southwestern should become one of the leading schools of the conference 
in this sport. 



jSou'toeBter 



^..Ouilive-r'sjravels 
III. through Southwestern- 1931 




The Choker Editor hereby 
Dedicates 



the 1931 Choker 
to 

Mr. CLAUDIO HOWARD 
and 



'WINDY' WILLIAMS 



j&oiTtocstcr 



The official 1931 Baseball Club, composed of Biological 
Impossibilities is as follows: 

Fontaine Erskine Short Stop 

Lucy Bowles First Base 

Frank Driskill Pitcher, Captain, Coach 

Sole Owner, and Manager 

Ding Dong Bell Catcher 

Allison Second Base 

Polly W acker Third Base 

Ollie Laird Left Field 

Wailes Gray Right Field 

Bill Smith Center Field 

Utility 



Annie Marie Doering 
Margaret Sneed 
Marie Berger 



dorthy cavitt 
Clovis Cox 
Laura Curry 



Sponsor 
Georgie V. Bridgers 



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PHILADELPHIA THEATRE 

Those boys who live down by the railroad track behind the athletic field enjoying 
the privacy of the closed thorofare have really lived a life of unobserved but wild 
pursuit of administration to extremely inflamed bronchial tubes most of the year. 
Apparently the lime house didn't lose its enchantment when it was padlocked, 
led by Dugy, the boys financed many trips to New 

Braunfels, Austin and other points north and south. 

To start the year under the leadership of the invincible Tom Cat Sharp, they 
pledge a veritable horde seeking to find quality. After the severe bump of the Pi 
K.A.'s and the more or less steam roller of the Kappa Sig they assumed the title 
given the Pi. K.A.'s last year. 

Butcher Buss more or less tired of the wild life of his three previous years decided 
to settle down so who should be called to his side but Miss Rives. Buss goes the 
way of Fred Sterling. Only Buss had more of a background. The invincible pair of 
Ding Dong and Sharp kept the campus guessing as to what would be the results of 
their combination. The result was Miss Southwestern. 

P. G. Secrest and Billv Stump made a very happy combination one promoting 
the Scholarship end and the other retaining the Boy Scout attitude. Diz Oatman 
playing true to form acting unconscious was the main drawback of the whole 
crowd. With the pack of pledges after being drilled very thoroughly in all the arts 
of their brothers stepped out demonstrating their ideals namely to remove the pos- 
sibilities of a barb organization. 

The Phis need to be complimented on not having any little brothers this year 
however this Bone came from Gatesville which for all practical purposes is the same 
as a little brother. 

Seems as though Brother Ding Dong took to heart the suggestion that it was ad- 
visable to hide him during rush week and he stayed prettv shy in order to give the 
Phis a better chance. 

This Napper, the boy with the 95 plus average, seems to have fallen down in his 
scholarship since he pledged a fraternity. We have always heard that this would 
happen now I guess we must believe it. 

We have not figured out why the K.A.'s could not find any thing in Dave Williams. 
The Phis seem to think the K.A.'s can do wrong. 



j^QiTtoestcr 



KAPPA SWIGMA 

These boys who inhabit the barn located diagonally from the president's office 
under the able leadership of the invincible Bill. And with the throwback of Duncan 
Whiteside have managed to weather the year fairlv well. Between the times of 
Polly Wacher's medical treatment for his inflamed bronchial tube and Murff Bled- 
soe's strict observance of his code of being cold sober, they have managed to live 
more or less a life of co-operation with the Administration. 

Their main-stays, Kurth and Strauss have managed to keep up the chapter's 
combination with Zeta Tau Alpha. 

The only one that amounts to anything from the bunch is this boy Grav who 
because of an inferiority complex has never tried his w ings. Maybe after the degrading 
opportunity of yell leader, we will have a different story. 

This Price Boy, the pride of Georgetown, seems to have the possibilities of 
another Whiteside. We hope not. 

Now this invincible Todd who is also noncomparable, he can save $24.95 out of 
his monthly allowance which is $25 per month continually living off of his brother's 
cigarettes and what nots. 

J. H. Porter. Fontaine Erskine, Ransom Buchholz and Harry Moore can 
hardly be ignored but certainly do not deserve any comment, however Gordon Noble 
and J. W. Hooker and Robert Purl and one half of the Van Dressars, seem to have 
earned comment but we do not care to waste anything on them. 



PI K.A. 

Under the able leadership of the four letter man Frank Driskill. the Pi K.A.'s 
composed of Buck Langford. Bunny Cook. Clarence Wiggam, Bill Murray and 
Vance Seaman, started the year with almost nothing and had less than that when 
the year ended. Of course since the faculty neighbor that they were troubled with 
last year has not been around, their activities have been more or less subrosa. Of 
course they could not very well do much because of the very nature of things. In 
politics they managed to muster all their forces and get this Red Booth and Bill 
Murray elected thereby raising their existing conditions a little better. The Cooke 
Brothers have added much to their social standing. Of course Beatty Oldham 
could not help it because he is not totally responsible along with Con Thomas who 



jSou'tocstcr 



has worked diligently to maintain the high standard that existed when he got 
there. Fred McKenzie has been too busy with outside interests to pay much atten- 
tion to anything on the inside. C. H. Gee and Rip Collins, the two little men, 
have been exceptionally nonexistent but Henry Price seems to have been very well 
pleased with the whole run of events. Taken as a whole this bunch who have been 
very fortunate because of their separation seem to have really gotten by with 
everything they have done. 



JAPPA ALPHAS 

(J.A.'s) 

These boys who rent their house from Mrs. Wilson in the fall and wish they 
could find another one for the rest of the year are more or less nonentities this 
year. Of course they have their pride and joy Papa Cortes' who does all the thinking 
for the outfit especially so since Homer King finished at the end of the winter 
term. He is the proud owner of their only automobile although he doesn't show it 
off, he is of good need. Paul Culwell their effervescing blushing, catch from Junior 
College has been too busy with outside interest to really deserve much consider- 
ation. The Triad Pennington, Allen and Lunsford have apparently had bad colds 
most of the year. At least judging from their actions after sundown. Outside of 
Duddy Weir, their contribution to the "S" Association all had bad colds. Of course 
this little Allen boy by being president of the "S" Association could do things and 
nobody think anything about it. This Terry-Turner combination which only 
existed very seldom is something to be commented on. Little Harris, because of 
being so much of the nonentity does not deserve much credit. 

Our dear friend and brother, Barcus, who is their contribution to the ministerial 
association because of his wonderful personality strength of character absolutely 
unquestionable integrity and unswerving loyalty to all his friends, cannot bear 
but the highest praise. 

Smiling Charlie Frederick, their only hold and main stay who is some relation 
to Scotty has managed to hoodwink and smile and scrape around and make that 
average to be included among 'em. Louie Oltorf and his cousin, Oltorf Holloway, 
have succeeded in keeping us all completely confused most of the time as to their 
identity. Because of inability we shall have to give them due credit. 

With their contributions of Bob Brent, Bill Smith, the latter having been to so 



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many schools so many years, we must mention them but do not care to elaborate 
or even please them with anything other than mention. 

In the past they have been political geniuses participating in every phase of pol- 
itics but this year there was an extremely bad shortage in materical and only Pudgy 
could hear the banner the God and the Ladies to victory. 



WOMEN'S SECTION 

Because of the change of attitude of certain parties in college, we must be content 
with only a very general resume of our sweet co-eds' organizations. To start out 
with this Tri Delta herd who insist that in numbers there is notoriety, we find 
sister Flinn as the head ramrod. Of course Miss Schoff in company with Miss 
Curry thoroly inspired the sisterly spirit must be commended because they cer- 
tainlv have a far reaching; ideal of their attitude towards their sisters. But shifting 
to the Zetas who between the fights of sister Young and little sister Pivito, have 
managed to run a very close second to the Tri Delta herd. Because of the number 
of town sisters their activities within the Woman's Building have been very quiet. 
The Phi Mus have displayed a remarkable capacity of influence over all of their 
members. Mama Avriett, by various and sundry methods, has been very successful 
more or less. Outside of losing most of their early promises to the Tri Delts and 
Alpha Delts they have played a very influential chord in the harmony of our dear 
family. But these Alpha Delts split asunder with two factions, one led by the ex- 
alted Miss Cavitt and the unchallenged Cox have certainly displayed a wonderful 
capacity to create much discord in the great symphony attempted by the happy 
family. It seems as though nothing could possibly be agreed upon unanimously. 

In the Y.W.C.A. led by Love, Stinson and James we have another sisterhood 
although not closely organized certainly functioning. 

Now the barbs: who constitute the major portion of the Epworth League 
Cabinet, Y.M.C.A. and Ministerial Association. Held together by that cattleman's 
delight — namely: barb wire seem to have not been able to function in one accord 
all the time but certainly have been able to get together around election time. 
Apparently the main function for their union is politics. They have contrihuted 
very limitedly to the happy family idea and bid to contribute less than that unless 
they by one means or another eject certain leaders such as Gibbons, Fox, Rumble, 
and Temple. 



jSou'tocstcr 



The would be political party: The Gray aches, Bennett, Fox, (he doesn't count) 
Pittman and Doering seemed to have gotten hot in the collar about the article in 
the Sophomore Edition of the Megaphone, the edition of Mr. "Red" Boothe, con- 
cerning their members in the bond, preferable barb wire As the old Chinese 

adverb goes "The truth will always hurt." While we are on the election we might 
recall the attempt of some of these outstanding ???? leaders (their own classification) 
to purchase an advertisement in the Megaphone. 

Thanks to the good fortune befalling the Choker Editor, he has been able to 
entertain vou folks with this extremelv interesting disclosure. 

Janie Marie Hill, that extremely beautiful but innocent ? Zeta, on Feb. 13, pre- 
vailed on Kirks sympathy and gained permission to see her sick mother. This is a 
new nomenclature for the engaging in the light and fantastic worship of the God 
of DANCE and association with the rough and uncouth collegiates who always 
have bad coughs and are attempting administration of the delightful but tabooed 
remedy. To get on with the story the brawl turned out to be a howling success with 
Miss Hill being under the able and talented management of this outstanding Kappa 
Sig Bill Barrett who volunteered his services as publicity manager. 

This Bucholz boy on the same night after being positive his cough was entirely 
taken care of led the orchestra during the wee small hours and returned to George- 
town to awake the following morning with a very bad headache and a baton. 
But since Doc Borden didn't make this social event the local police force were 
wall flowers the entire evening. 

In spite of the numberless speculations no one has offered a satisfactory expla- 
nation for the member of the Faculty's black eye which he humbly bore for two 
weeks. Possibly he ran into a door. 

On March the second or thereabouts it seems that Miss Gertrude Rowe when 
she was a house guest of the Kappa Alpha was very much interested in the appear- 
ance of the rooms other than the parlors and dining rooms. 

Allison what is your idea of so much Pi K.A. publicity? If you want a bid I believe 
the boys still have a few bushel baskets that possibly could be gleaned for a pledge 
button if you can convince them that you are desirable material. 

Anyone desirous of information pertaining to the cost of dates, including rent 
car bills, drinks, theater, and eats may inquire for Miss Patty Perkins. I might 
comment that this is one way of being entertained. 



j&ou'tocstcr 



Margaret Sneed seems to think that this Saturday night bath is just a fad par- 
ticipated in by moderns and since she is old fashion she doesn't apparently indulge- 
We recommend Life Buoy. 

We wonder just what was the cause of the beautiful and very tasty angel food 
cake having the appearance of the steam roller effect on the senior picnic. Of course 
our esteemed and highly regarded Jumbo and Belly would never even bear the 
faintest suspicion of ever being incapable of being absolute master of the situation 
at least both at once. 

We wonder further if Polly Wacker is so disillusioned that he is under the im- 
pression that he can bolster up his social standing by soliciting female week end 
guests for a blow out in Bartlett, not too many to be boresome but just enough to 
be interesting. For some reason this idea didn't go over so big. Old pard, have you 
ever tried Thyborine, Mi 31 Solution, or Lis ferine, possibly this is the secret of your 
failure. 

Was Peterman trying to carry out practices shown by Conrad Nagel in Free 
Love when he socked his lady love in the jaw in the Lobby or was he just serving 
as her sparring partner preparatory to the big fight with Miss Universe her own 
judgment in the little store. 

This Blossom Nalle the sixteen-year-old prodigy who upon entering this local 
institution pledged Phi Mu and for some unknown reason is now a bonafide mem- 
ber of the three triangle herd whose motto is'Tn quantity we stand a chance to 
get Quality." Had a very good time over the Christinas holidays in the company 
of other town students doctoring coughs and other maladies especially lack of 
masculine company. Furniture tells tales. For the purpose of further enlightenment 
anyone may interrogate Moran McDaniels. Jenny Davis and John Barton Davis. 

Jack Cook that member of Alpha Omicron is sure a man who delights and 
attracts feminine companionship. Just another Cook all of whom think they are 
without a doubt the divines contribution to the opposite sex maybe this is the ex- 
planation of the phrase All Cooks are Pi K.A's. 

Because of the inability and impossibility of the Choker doing absolute just-ce 
to these formative preachers we hereby mention them but will refrain from ignoring 
them. 

Mary Kulm Browning, S. U.'s only real sweet angelic co-ed who is unalterably 
and almost prejudicedly opposed to any of the modern practices enjoyed by our 



jSou'tocstcr 



happy family, namely: smoking, , or pretending to have a cold and doc- 

toring said fake cold. Still thinks she can have a date with anyone and still talk 
the same kind of bass. 

We would like to know the main cause for Mary Emma Neyland and Patty 
Perkins frequent visits out of town. Is the ice cream good? 

Lois Thornton has at least got a man who has to look up to her. Ask Sam how it 
is done. 

Nan Holland has her beautiful bungalow already planned. We believe she says 
it is in Georgetown. 

Willie Lee Heath attempting to give the boys a break gave Jumbo a little house 
and apparently he tried to take a whole office building. 

Ask Frances Wherry, Ruth Martin, Mary Emma Neyland and Willie Lee Heath 
about that big fire they had last December on that real cold night. 

Cherrille DeBardeleben inaugurated a very old custom, namely of becoming 
attached very early in the year but apparently Hoss could not talk enough bass so 
Burgin out -basses him. 

Do you remember Seawillow Pipkin's and Ruth Martin's trip to the Dallas 
Fair? 

Of all the years Doc Borden has attended our local institution, he has hibernated 
every winter. Maybe there is some explanation. Possibly his brothers would prefer 
if he must play to play with some nice unharnessed playmate. 

Between Mrs. Wilson's eternal vigilance and the numerous uninvited alumni 
the K.A.'s have had a hard time keeping in with the faculty and up with the Kappa 
Swigmas. What they would do without Papa Cortes' dexterous diplomacy is beyond 
surmise. 

Murff Bledsoe, with that braggadocio air boasts that he is always "cold sober." 
Perhaps it was the iron bars of a small cell of Round Rock that cooled him off a 
certain evening not over a year ago. 

For a long time the Pi K. A.'s barn was uninhabited. Of course there is Wig but 
he can't count. But since the revival of the old custom patterned after the herd 
they are managing very well to inhabit the house. 



;Sou'toestcr 



Speaking of smokers, it's all a matter of pan-hellenic and faculty tastes, especially 
with the Zetas calling their affair in Austin a Formal Dinner. 

Even some of the most discriminating critics agree that Con Thomas showed 
great talent as an aesthetic dancer at the Pi K.A. Smoker. 

Swick evidently was unaware of the alarming fact that an honor council member 
roomed across the hall from Lib King. A hazardous risk, don't you think, Swick? 

Cecil Pennington flat has assumed some notoriety since his family moved to 
Austin. 

The Phi Mus pride and joy. little Nelle, apparently lost her appeal or maybe 
Phi pins have suffered a shortage. 

Maybe Buss could tell us why it is that Brother Kurth from Austin doesn't 
visit Texas Gamma any more? 

Brother Mac. apparently disregarded all rules of sane partying when he enter- 
tained the whole Woman's Building while his parents were away. 

How about San Antonio trip last fall of Wylie and Sellars. Bledsoe and Borden. 

Here's to Helen Woodson, our own candidate for "Miss Southwestern" be- 
cause she believes in impartiality and treatment of all boys alike. Is Dorbrandt a 
chump? 

We just wonder if Annie Dee Smith was the girl who got two black eves jumping 
rope. 

Loveless Love — Wailes Gray and Eunice James. 

The Alimony League — Sam Laird, Gill Dewitt and Ruth Leggett. 

Gertrude Rowe must not be all present judging with her association with Polly 
Wacker. 

Duggan Daniel who was nobody's big moment last year blossomed out this spring 
with a new car and lots of popularity. What is it Dugie, your cargo of corn? 

George Smith and Hess Williams may be rated good gang war promoters. 



jgou'tocstcr 









Send your clothes to My Dad 


R. L. LOGAN 


Dry Cleaners - Hatters - Dyers 


PHONE 262 GEORGETOWN 



This book is cased in an S. K. Smith 
cover — a cover that is guaranteed to 
be satisfactory and is created and 
SMITHCRAFTED by an organiza- 
tion of craftsmen specializing in the 
creation and production of good cov- 
ers. Whatever your cover require- 
ments may be, this organization can 
satisfy them. 

Send for information and prices to 

The S. K. Smith Co. 

213 Institute Place 
Chicago, 111. 


J. R. Reed Music Co. 

AUSTIN'S 
Leading Music House 

} our Friends 


Where a Warmer Welcome Awaits You 

The 
EDSON HOTEL 

A MODERN HOTEL 
350 Rooms With Ceiling 
Fans, Servidors, Running 
Ice Water, Shower & Tub 
Baths. Superior Food Ser- 
vice. 

Garage in Connection 

Pearl and Liberty Streets 
BEAUMONT, TEXAS 

Louis 0. Lagarde 
Manager 


THE DRISKILL 

Austin's Largest Hotel 

300 Rooms of Solid Comfort 

Southwestern students and friends in- 
vited to make our home your home. 

W. L. Stark 
Manager 



When in after years you turn the 
pages of this Sou'wester, the class 
history of the year of 1930-1931 in the 
photos of all the students that you knew 
and you will recall all the faces of old 
friends and acquaintances, may this fa- 
miliar slogan, "THE SIGN OF GOOD 
CLOTHES" that has appeared in all 
your college publications again come to 
your mind, and your friends and support- 
ers at this store that features the newest 
of college styles while they are new. 




The Toggery 

Roy Richardson 
Manager 



FINE DIAMONDS 



FINE WATCHES 



42 1 ears Same Location 



J. KOEN & SONS 

Jewelers 

105 East 6th Just off the Avenue 

AUSTIN 



FINE JEWELRY 



FINE NOVELTIES 




^ akowitzT \ro<. 

ON MAIN AT RUSK 
HOUSTON 

For the New Ideas In University- 
Correct Apparel, Visit Sakowitz 

VARSITY SHOP 

Clothes for every occasion, styled to 
the exacting demands of college men, 
and shown in a department arranged 
especially for you. 



Sakowilz 2nd Floor 










IThe 


Fine Art ol 


"Hotel Comfort 




at its best 




Whenever travelers discuss Texas 




hotels — and they do discuss them fre- 




quently and favorably — words of praise 




are almost certain to be said for mem- 




bers of the Rice Hotel Group. Thought- 


RICE HOTEL 


ful management . . . a considerate serv- 


1000 rooms . . . dining room . . . 


ice planned for the comfort and conven- 


cafeteria . . coffee shops. $2.00 up 


ience of guests . . . and a well deserved 




reputation for serving fine food have 


LAMAR HOTEL 


built for these institutions a prestige 
which extends much farther than Texas 


Social Center of Houston. 500 


and the Southwest. 


rooms and apartments. $2.50 up 





TEXAS STATE 




Houston's most modern hotel, 




400 rooms all with bath. $2.50 up 




SAN JACINTO 





Formerly the Bender. Recently 
remodeled at cost of $350,000.00. 


- RICE HOTEL GROUP 


$1.50 up 


HOUSTON 



WHERE SOUTHWESTERN GOES 


W HEN their throat is 
dry or they crave a bite to eat ... it is al- 
ways to The Alcove that the entire stu- 
dent body of Southwestern University 
makes its way. Here they find thirst - 
quenching drinks and hunger satisfying 
sandwiches . . . plus jiffy service. 


J_ KEEP that appear- 
ance . . . that gives them a feeling of 
self confidence and makes their compan- 
ionship sought ... it is always to the 
Alcove Beauty Shoppe that the fair South 
western Co-ed wends her way. Here she 
finds modern equipment and expert oper- 
ators. 


the ALCOVE 


the ALCOVE 


CONFECTIONERY 


BEAUTY SHOPPE 


Centre of all student social activities 


Upstairs over the Alcove Confectionery 


Mr. BritRea i jp] I\ E A S Mrs - M - A - Rea 


Always — true friends of the S. U. Student 




DIAMONDS 









watches, jewels, silver 






H 1 


— GIFTS— - 

and, with each treasure you choose at Hertzbcrg's . . . 

no matter how small its cost ... is that intangible but 

quite unmistakable mark of qualhy which, for over ,^f^^fc\ 

half a century has distinguished gifts bearing the f$£ml£$ \\k 

Hertzberg name. vltSlf 1 1 






Hertzberg \J) 






Jewelry Co. 






Founded 1878 SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS 











J. J. BRENEKE 

Jewelry, Majestic Radios and Electric 

Refrigerators 
Glasses fitted,watch and jewelry repairing 
Georgetown Texas 


Compliments of 
STAR GROCERY 
Georgetown 


THE WILLIAMSON COUNTY SUN 
Side by side with Southwestern for 59 years 
Publishers Printers Stationers 


Compliments of 
BEN FRANKLIN STORE 


Compliments of 
S. T. ATKIN FURNITURE CO. 
Furniture — floor coverings — Stoves 
Georgetown Texas 


Compliments of 
YOUNG'S DAIRY 


GUGENHEIM -GOLDSMITH CO. 

Wholesale Fruit and Produce 
Austin Texas 


Compliments of 
A. G. BRAUN MOTOR CO. 


Compliments of 

WILLIAM STRAUSS 

Houston Texas 


SINCLAIR PENNSYLVANIA 
Motor Oil 
100% Pennsylvania Grade Oil 

Phone 72 


Compliments of 

DR. C. C. CODY 

Houston Texas 


Compliments of 
WILL E. ORGAIN 



To the Class of '31 

(greetings 



Your life's interim of study and training is 
now over. Before you lie years of achieve- 
ment in which all the powers of your knowl- 
edge will be your greatest benefactor. The 
Jesse H. Jones interests bid you a. swift, 
smooth journey to success in your chosen 
undertaking. 



The National Bank of Commerce, Houston 

A modern bank offering every service expected of 
up-to-date institutions. Its facilities include safety 
deposit vaults; saving funds; Trust Department, and 
Travel Bureau. Capital, $1,000,000.00. Surplus, 
$2,000,000.00. 

Jesse H. Jones & Co., Houston 

Owning- and operating the following office build- 
ings in Houston: Gulf, Bankers Mortgage, Rusk, 
Kirby, Electric, and National Standard. Also re- 
tail locations and industrial sites. 

Bankers Mortgage Company, Houston 

First Mortgage 6% Collateral Trust Gold Bonds, 
a safe investment for your surplus funds. "Twenty- 
one years investment service without loss to a 
client." Capital and Surplus, $2,600,000.00. 

Rice Hotel, Houston 

The largest in Dixie is "Houston's Welcome to the 
World." One thousand outside rooms. Cafeteria, 
Dining Room, Dancing on the roof in the summer. 
B. F. Orr, Manager. 



Texas State Hotel, Houston 

Carrying forward the finest traditions of Southern 
Hospitality. Four hundred comfortable rooms, spa- 
cious lobby and restful mezzanine. R. Bruce Carter, 
Gen'l Mgr. 

Lamar Hotel, Houston 

Apartments and suites for permanent residents. Com- 
fortable spacious rooms. Famous "Black Mammy" 
Cafeteria and Spanish Dining Room. R. Bruce 
Carter, Gen'l Mgr. 

San Jacinto Hotel, Houston 

The newest in this chain of celebrated Hotels. 
Offering every modern advancement and improve- 
ment for the convenience and comfort of per- 
manent and transient guests. R. Bruce Carter, Gen'l 

Mgr. 

Worth Hotel, Ft. Worth 

A modern, complete hotel in the center of down- 
town Fort Worth. Three hundred superior rooms 
with bath. Jack Farrell, Manager. 



ACME 



DRY CLEANERS - HATTERS - DYERS 



Georgetown, Texas 



One of the most modern equipped plants 
in Central Texas 

PHONE 76 



THE WISDOM OF THE WORLD IS STORED IN BOOKS: 

READ GOOD BOOKS AND YOU INCREASE YOUR 

KNOWLEDGE 

BOOKS OF ALL PUBLISHERS AND SERVICE UNEXCELLED 

SEND FOR OUR COMPLETE CATALOGUE 

Publishing House M. E. Church South 

Lamar & R hitmore, Agents 
THE SOUTHS LARGEST BOOK STORE 

1308 COMMERCE STREET 

DALLAS, TEXAS 



R. J. STONE 



Southwestern s Photographer 



Georgetown, Texas 



@fe 



Photos can be had from any picture 
appearing in the Sou'wester 



©fe 



Hand colored portraits, miniatures, and 
hand painted portraits on canvas 



ONE PRICE 
Cash or Credit 




flflBijj i 





uTTiTln 




Fine 



DIAMONDS 

T 

WATCHES 

T 

J EWELRY 



""Home of Good Luck If cdding Rings' 




516 E. Houston St. Estd. 1852 

SAN ANTONIO 



The Marie Antoinette 




EXCLUSIVE CO-ED SHOP 


French Boot Shop 


Be Sure to Pav us a Visit 


"Bootiers to College Women" 


While in Austin 




Will be in our New Home 


Congress near Eighth 


716 Congress Avenue 


AUSTIN 


July 15th 






E. L. MUNS0N 


Compliments of 


Successor to 


E. L. CRAIN 


Hendersons Garage 


HOUSTON, TEXAS 


Dealer in 




Texaco Products 





When in Austin visit 


The Edwards 




Cafe 


Robt. Mueller & Bro. 




THE AUSTIN TRUNK FACTORY 


OPEN DAY AND NIGHT 


Largest and Most Complete Line of 




Trunks and Leather Goods In 




Central Texas 




510 Congress Ave. Austin. Texas 


Texas Service Station 


Texaco Products 


Expert Washing and Greasing Service 


Diamond Tires and Tubes 


Driverless Rent Cars 


Phone 560 



For First Class 

TAXI SERVICE RENT CARS 

Rogers Transfer 

Phone 63 Phone 63 



Smart Persons 

DEPEND ON 

SCARBROUGH'S 

For Fashion Leadership 

Smart Persons know that ScarbrongrTs chooses 
for and presents to University students the most 
significant new versions of the "college mode.'* 
That is the reason that each week brings us so 
many students from Southwestern. 

E. M. Scarbrougli & Sons 

AUSTIN, TEXAS 



YEA PIRATES WE ARE FOR YOU 


WM. CAMERON LUMBER CO. 


R. R. MESSER, Manager 


PHONE 42 


We carry all University books and 


Follow the Magnolia trail 


supplies 


Magnolia Maximum Mileage Gasoline 


Nice line of stationery 


Magnolia Ethyl Gasoline 


Nice line of jewelry 


SOCONY MOTOR OIL 


Do watch and jewelry repairing also 


100% Paraffin base 


picture framing 






O 


$ 


J. V. ROWLETT 




Agent 


WILCOX BROS. 


Georgetown, Texas 



Compliments of 

J. W. REYNOLDS 

HOUSTON, TEXAS 



B. L. PAGE 

PALACE BARBER SHOP 

Back of Citv National Bank 

Where the students always find 
the best in barber work 



A. B. RHODES FIN BARTLEY 



YEARWOOD & JOHNSON GARAGE 

R. C. Johnson, Manager 



GAS, OILS 

and 

AUTOMOBILE ACCESSORIES 



General Repair Work 



TELEPHONE 106 



PATRICK BROTHERS 

DRY CLEANERS & TAILORS 



"We are students at heart, and take great pride 
in saying that Southwestern Students and pa- 
trons are our friends." 

12 YEARS EXPERIENCE 

Our representatives are always glad to cooperate by giving 
satisfactory service 

Phone 381 Phone 381 



THE BELFORD LUMBER CO. 

Lumber and Contracting 



Building materials of all kinds 



Phone 34 Georgetown, Texas 



T. H. WILLIAMS & CO. 

The Stvie Center of Austin 



Against a back ground of tradition and 
lone service to women of central Texas 
and Southwestern Girls, Williams a sin- 
gular position in the minds fashion-wise 
women. 



Ready-to-W ear Millinery 

Accessories 



JOHN BREMOND CO. 




remond I 

ROASTER f 

Goffits 



IMPROVED PROCESS 

TEX** 



ESTABLISHED 1847 




/O meet tke special 
banking needs of Indus- 
try and skipping in tke 
Soutkwest kas been the 
constant pokey of tkis 
bank since its organi- 
sation, in. 1866. 




THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

OF HOUSTON 




R.ide the Greyhounds" -To all Texas Ctti.es 
Southland Greqhound Linesjncl 



The Farmers State Bank 

Georgetown, Texas 



Georgetown, the home of Southwestern Univer- 
sity, is a good place to live. It is the best residence 
town in the state. 

This bank will appreciate your account, whether 
large or small. 

Our banking facilities are the best and are all at 
the service of our customers. 

If you live here, come in and see us. You will be 
welcome. 

If you live elsewhere, write us for information or 
any service and your letters will receive the prompt 
attention of our information department. 



Directors 

E. G. Gillett, President 

W. L. Price, Cashier 

D. W. Wilcox 

H. N. Graves 



THE STAFF OF THE 1931 SOU'WESTER 
WISHES TO HEREBY GRATEFULLY AC- 
KNOWLEDGE THE FRIENDLY INTEREST 
AND MATERIAL SUPPORT GIVEN US IN 
THE BUILDING OF THIS ANNUAL BY ONE 
OF SOUTHWESTERN^ LOYAL 
EX-STUDENTS 



Mrs. J. J. Perkins 



Wichita Falls, Texas 



BARRETT-LEECR Inc. 



JEWELERS 

2384 Guadalupe Street 
Austin, Texas 



JEWELERY FOR THE UNIVERSITY AND 
COLLEGIATE WORLD 



Badges and Crests of all National Fraternities and Sororities 
School and Class Emblems 



'OUR INTEGRITY EXPRESSED BY OUR DESIRE TO SERVE YOU" 



FRANK DRISKILL, Southwestern Representative 



Without Education 

there is no Progress 



The world moves steadily forward. 
Each succeeding generation witnesses 
developments that add to the betterment 
and joy of living. These things are the re- 
sult of minds that have been trained to 
think, create and act. 

The world looks to you seniors, who are 
just now entering upon a new career to 
carry-on the progress that has been made 



during past generations. Upon your shoul- 
ders rests the responsibility of achieving 
the even greater progress that is expected 
in the future. 

You have had the education and training 
necessary to accomplish your task. The 
opportunities await you. Initiative, agres- 
siveness and ability will result in the prog- 
ress expected of you. 



. Jesse H. Jones . 



We show our appreciation of Southwestern 
students by giving courteous banking service 

THE CITY NATIONAL BANK 

OF GEORGETOWN 



Safe 



Si 



mcere 



Serviceable 







Courtesy — 


THE FOX COMPANY 


The Southwestern 


i h 


Telephone Company 


The Kodak Work in the Sou'wester 




is a sample of our development. 




We appreciate the work sent us, 


(District Offices) 


Sou'wester, and would like to have 




you visit our plant when in San 


GEORGETOWN, TEXAS 


Antonio. 


PALACE THEATRE 


"Where Georgetown is Entertained 77 



THE MOST MODERN 

DRY CLEANING PLANT 

IN CENTRAL TEXAS 

Wishes You a Very Pleasant Vacation 



We want to thank you lor your patronage of the 
past year. We trust that our service pleased you. Next 
year send us your dresses, suits, sweaters, etc., for 
prompt satisfactory SERVICE. 



TROY LAUNDRY & 
DRY CLEANING PLANT 



miorsK 11 



J. C. McINNIS, Pres. T. W. COOPER, Sec. & Treas. 



McINNIS DRUG CO. 



'The Best in Drug Store Merchandise 
The Best in Drug Store Service" 



The Drug Store Students Know Best 



The Pirate Tavern 



McINNIS DRUG CO., Owners 



The Student Book Exchange 



Opposite Main Entrance Southwestern University 









A PINE 

essaril) 
For ins 
pride ii 

Here ir 
workec 


A m 


iot nec- 
t helps. 
r equal 

en have 
'wester 


Hi ft^ — 


I'll ■ iiikhj 
I ft B I N 1 ,r<)M 

CONfANY 1 'jj^. 
' ■ yPttming • " 1 , T : *$i|& 


THE TOWER AS IT APPEARS MOST ANY MOONLIT NIGHT 

business home with the most modern facilities does i 
r insure superior work .... But we have found that i 
tance, pride in our surroundings causes a necessity fo 
i the work we create. 

i this modern building a group of sincere men and worn 
1 with pleasure in the plan and production of the 193 1 Sou 

THE REIN COMPANY 

HOUSTON, TEXAS 

Printers of The 1 93 i Sou'wester 





SEiTICE IMUAYIMCCAimc. 

SAM AMT#MI# 



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